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I have a lot of common logic for my test, so I decide to share it by extending. I've wrote two classes: TestNumberOne which extends TestBase.

TestBase.java

import org.junit.After;
import org.junit.AfterClass;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.BeforeClass;

/**
 * @author Pavel Ryzhov
 * @since 2013-03-03
 */
public class TestBase {

    @BeforeClass
    public static void beforeClass() {
        System.out.println("beforeClass() in TestBase");
        System.out.flush();
    }

    @AfterClass
    public static void afterClass() {
        System.out.println("afterClass() in TestBase");
        System.out.flush();
    }

    @Before
    public void before() {
        System.out.println("before() in TestBase");
        System.out.flush();
    }

    @After
    public void after() {
        System.out.println("after() in TestBase");
        System.out.flush();
    }
}

TestNumberOne.java

import org.junit.*;

/**
 * @author Pavel Ryzhov
 * @since 2013-03-03
 */
public class TestNumberOne extends TestBase {

    @Test
    public void anyTest() {
        System.out.println("anyTest() in TestNumberOne");
        System.out.flush();
    }
}

I've got such a strange output when I execute my tests:

before() in TestBase
anyTest() in TestNumberOne
after() in TestBase
beforeClass() in TestBase
afterClass() in TestBase

Why does it has so strange order? And are there any conventions of extending JUnit test classes?

UPDATE:

  1. Tests are run in IDEA
  2. To get such a strange results I've run them several times (other results was as expected)
share|improve this question
    
How do you "print the name and classname"? Is there buffering going on? – Jim Garrison Mar 3 '13 at 8:28
    
I use simple System.out.pringln(...). I guess buffering is going on, but it has to keep it order in buffer anyway. – Pavel Ryzhov Mar 3 '13 at 8:32
    
Are the BeforeClass/AfterClass methods static? Edit your post to include the Java. – Jim Garrison Mar 3 '13 at 8:37
    
Anyaway i've add flush() invocation after each output... But the output is the same – Pavel Ryzhov Mar 3 '13 at 8:43
    
Static methods are not inherited. They belong to TestBase only. Not to TestNumberOne. – JB Nizet Mar 3 '13 at 8:56
up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

This is definitely Intellij IDEA issue. If I run your code by maven it runs ok.

If I run it in Intellij several times than I sometimes get the incorrect output as you do.

Actually I found a way to reproduce it:

  • Add Thread.sleep(1000) after each output message.
  • Turn of "Track running test" in Run test window (blue circle above list of run tests)
  • Run whole TestNumberOne test class in Intellij (even though you have only one test method) -> output should be in correct order
  • click on the anyTest method in the test list and then at the TestNumberOne -> output is in incorrect order

(also If you run it with sleep you see that the output is in correct order but gets reordered when the test ends)

So the are run in correct order, only the output is messed up.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't find "Track running test" button, but the output is really messed up! – Pavel Ryzhov Mar 8 '13 at 8:59
    
Do you know why output is messing up? I can't understand why... – Pavel Ryzhov Mar 10 '13 at 13:33

When I try your code, I just get the expected output, ie

beforeClass() in TestBase
before() in TestBase
anyTest() in TestNumberOne
after() in TestBase
afterClass() in TestBase

(launched with Eclipse). Which is the convention ^^ Your result is really strange indeed ...

share|improve this answer

don't know of any conventions. in junit 3, the base class was usually abstract.

the following seems to come out in a sane order (except perhaps for the teardowns).

import org.junit.*;
public class BaseTestCase {
    public static String method() {
        return Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace()[2].getMethodName() + "()";
    }
    @BeforeClass public static void classSetupBaseClass() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
    @AfterClass public static void classTeardownBaseClass() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
    @Before public void setupBaseClass() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
    @After public void teardownBaseClass() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
    @Test public void aTestInBaseClass() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
}


import static org.junit.Assert.*;
import org.junit.*;

public class  So15183669 extends BaseTestCase {
    @BeforeClass public static void classSetup() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
    @AfterClass public static void classTeardown() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
    @Before public void setup() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
    @After public void teardown() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
    @Test public void aTest() {
        System.out.println(method());
    }
}


classSetupBaseClass()
classSetup()
setupBaseClass()
setup()
aTest()
teardown()
teardownBaseClass()
setupBaseClass()
setup()
aTestInBaseClass()
teardown()
teardownBaseClass()
classTeardown()
classTeardownBaseClass()
share|improve this answer
    
Here is the same class code twice :) Please attach another class code. – Pavel Ryzhov Mar 3 '13 at 8:47
    
oops, sorry, fixed. – Ray Tayek Mar 3 '13 at 8:50
    
Output in your case is completly as I expected it should be... But when I try mine several times it changes, and sometimes it's crasy like in my question above. – Pavel Ryzhov Mar 3 '13 at 9:09
    
very strange. how are you running your tests? – Ray Tayek Mar 3 '13 at 21:06
    
in IntelliJ IDEA... i use "run" button several times – Pavel Ryzhov Mar 4 '13 at 5:41

I think when you run the tests, your TestBase is also being run as it's own junit test. Try calling it HelperBase instead.

share|improve this answer

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