Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm a newbie to SDL and I've read about a dozen introductory tutorials so far. I'm a bit puzzled about the difference between hardware and software surfaces (i.e. the SDL_HWSURFACE and SDL_SWSURFACE flags in the call to SDL_SetVideoMode()), and how SDL_UpdateRect() behaves for each type of surface. My understanding is that for a hardware surface, there is no need to call SDL_UpdateRect() because one is drawing directly to the display screen. However, the example in this Wikibooks tutorial (http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/SDL_%28Simple_DirectMedia_Layer%29) shows otherwise: it calls SDL_UpdateRect() on a hardware surface.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

SDL_UpdateRect() has nothing to do with surface type.(don't use it when using SDL OpenGL). You should call it whenever you have to update a (part) of a SDL_Surface. In fact everytime you flip a surface a SDL_UpdateRect(screen, 0, 0, 0, 0) is called for that surface.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks but well i'd say this is not quite in line with what I've read in SDL documentation, hence adding to my confusion unfortunately! As far as I understand it, a buffer "flip" is achieved through SDL_Flip() and not through SDL_Rect. And according to libsdl.org/docs/html/sdlflip.html, SDL_Flip() behaves like SDL_Rect() when double buffering is not used or enabled for the surface. –  Chiraz BenAbdelkader Mar 3 '13 at 18:21

I'm a bit puzzled about the difference between hardware and software surfaces (i.e. the SDL_HWSURFACE and SDL_SWSURFACE flags in the call to SDL_SetVideoMode())

In the SDL documentation, AFAIK, they simply state that software surfaces are stored in system memory (your computer RAM) and hardware surface are stored in video memory (your GPU RAM) and that hardware surface may take advantage of hardware acceleration (see below on SDL_Flip).

Though the documentation doesn't says much about it, there are differences, e.g., I know that when using alpha blending software surfaces are better than hardware ones performance-wise. I also heard that software surfaces are better for direct pixel access, but I can't confirm it.

and how SDL_UpdateRect() behaves for each type of surface

The behavior is the same for both: the function updates the given rectangle in the given surface. Maybe, implementation-wise, there must be differences, but, again, the documentation does not state anything about it.

For SDL_Flip though it is a different story: when using it with hardware surfaces, it attempts to swap video buffers (only possible if the hardware supports double buffering, remember to pass the SDL_DOUBLEBUF flag to SDL_SetVideoMode). If the hardware does not support double buffering or if it is a software surface the SDL_Flip call is equivalent to updating the entire surface area with SDL_UpdateRect (SDL_UpdateRect(screen, 0, 0, 0, 0)).

My understanding is that for a hardware surface, there is no need to call SDL_UpdateRect() because one is drawing directly to the display screen.

No, you shall call it just as with software surfaces.

Also note that the chosen name to the surface parameter on SDL_UpdateRect and SDL_Flip functions can be a little misleading: the parameter name is screen, but it can be any SDL_Surface (not just the surface that represents the user screen). Most of time (at least for simple applications) you will be blitting only on the screen surface, but it makes sense (and some times is necessary) to blit in other surfaces that are not the user screen one.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks for the response though I'm still confused. I have 3 related remarks: (1) "updating a surface" means you are refreshing what is displayed on the screen, in order to reflect a change in the contents of the surface. (2) Since a hardware surface is directly stored on the video card (as you rightly noted), doesn't this mean that when we change the contents of the surface we are directly changing what is displayed (and hence there is no need to "update" via UpdateRect()). (3) Why would we need to update a surface, when the surface does not represent a display screen? Does this make sense? –  Chiraz BenAbdelkader Mar 5 '13 at 17:47

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.