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What is the fastest way take list of primitivtes and convert it to nullable list of primitives for example: List<int> to List<int?> in c#

the easy solution, creating new list and adding every item with foreach loop takes too much time.

Thanks

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what's your definition of too much time? The only way is to loop (either with foreach or LINQ) –  psubsee2003 Mar 3 '13 at 10:12
2  
not to be smart, but aren't you able to refactor you code slightly so that you don't have to convert? –  bas Mar 3 '13 at 11:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There is no way faster than creating a new list:

var newList = list.Select( i => (int?)i ).ToList();

However using LINQ is slower that using a bare loop.

The fastest way is to use a List<int?> with pre-allocated capacity:

List<int?> newList = new List<int?>(list.Count); // Allocate enough memory for all items
foreach (var i in list)
    newList.Add(i);

If you are seeking for in-place type change of items, that's not possible.

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1  
Well it would be faster not using LINQ. –  Jeff Mercado Mar 3 '13 at 10:18
    
@JeffMercado Actually, I agree :-) I've not measured the performance difference, but I guess it is negligible. –  MD.Unicorn Mar 3 '13 at 10:21
1  
Not using LINQ is 50% faster as my benchmark pointed out. –  Fuex Mar 3 '13 at 11:39
2  
@Fuex Interesting. My test also shows that a bare loop is 30%-40% faster than LINQ (with 1,000,000) items. –  MD.Unicorn Mar 3 '13 at 12:07

If you want to know what's the faster solution, you should do a little benchmark by using the three different ways:

List<int> list = Enumerable.Range( 0, 10000 ).ToList( );
Stopwatch sw = Stopwatch.StartNew( );

for ( int i = 0; i < 100000; i++ ) {
   List<int?> newList = new List<int?>( );
   foreach( int integer in list )
      newList.Add( ( int? ) integer );
}

sw.Stop( );
TimeSpan timespan = sw.Elapsed;
Console.WriteLine( String.Format( "Foreach: {0:00}:{1:00}:{2:00}", timespan.Minutes, timespan.Seconds, timespan.Milliseconds / 10 ) );
sw.Restart( );

for ( int i = 0; i < 100000; i++ ){
   List<int?> newList = list.Select( x => ( int? ) x ).ToList( );
}

sw.Stop( );
timespan = sw.Elapsed;
Console.WriteLine( String.Format( "LINQ-Select: {0:00}:{1:00}:{2:00}", timespan.Minutes, timespan.Seconds, timespan.Milliseconds / 10 ) );
sw.Restart( );

for ( int i = 0; i < 100000; i++ ){
   List<int?> newList = list.Cast<int?>( ).ToList( );
}

sw.Stop();
timespan = sw.Elapsed;
Console.WriteLine( String.Format( "LINQ-Cast: {0:00}:{1:00}:{2:00}", timespan.Minutes, timespan.Seconds, timespan.Milliseconds / 10 ) );

Results:

Benchmark

As we could expect the best way is the first solution (foreach) which means loop through the elements, cast and add them to a new list.

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Have you tried it without foreach and using a simple "for(i = 0; i < list.Count();i++")? as in stackoverflow.com/questions/365615/… –  EGOrecords Mar 3 '13 at 11:48
    
Interesting fact, so the SO-Answer I provided is a little bit out of date ;) –  EGOrecords Mar 3 '13 at 12:01
1  
Don't forget to set the Capacity of the list in the foreach case to make it faster and leaner. –  Hans Passant Mar 3 '13 at 13:04

Instead of Select you can stick to the Cast LINQ-operator:

List<int> first = new List<int>() {1, 2, 3};
List<int?> second = first.Cast<int?>().ToList();
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