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So, basically, check the picture below:

Image

This is a grid of 4x5 explained, however the actual challenge requires you to input the grid dimensions. So, my job is to write a program that calculates the amount of turns you make (red dots in this case). The starting position is always in the bottom left corner. The guy is moving by the arrows of the clock ("right").

The program input / output is: you input the grid dimensions: 4 5 (for example)

you output the amount of changes of direction. 7

So, I have absolutely no idea how it's done. The solution I have seen only is the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
using namespace std;
int main() {
    long long n, i,pom,m;
    int k,br=0;

    cin>>n>>m;
    if(n>m) {
        int pom=n;
        n=m;
        m=n;
    }
    if(n+1>=m)
        cout<<(n-1)+(m-1);
    else
        cout<<(n-1) +(n-1)+1;

    return 0;
}

But I don't understand the following example... could anyone explain what's going? Or any other way of solving this problem is always welcome.

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Have you tried running the example? Does it produce correct results? –  n.m. Mar 3 '13 at 11:17
    
Yes, it does produce correct answers. But I have no idea how. –  John Smith Mar 3 '13 at 11:19
    
The code probably reflects the way of thinking of the person who wrote it, though it's hard to decipher that from the code. You can calculate the same thing in an easier way. –  anatolyg Mar 3 '13 at 11:36
    
@anatolyg which is? –  John Smith Mar 3 '13 at 11:47

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
int res = 0;
if(height == width)
    res = height * 2 - 2;//when height is odd than you will have 2 rows with single red dot
                           //when height is even you will have one row without red dot (all the rest have 2 red dots.
else if (width > height)
   res = height * 2 - 1;//one rows with 1 red dot the rest with 2 red dots.
else //height > width
   res = width * 2 - 2// 2 columns with one red dot and the rest with 2 red dots.
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I am not a C++ guy so can't help in understanding the code. But can surely help understanding the situation here. The situation is that the number of turns will depend only on one of the two dimensions. Which ever is less. So the number of turns depends on the smaller dimension and number of boxes on that side. Because here in picture when you take a 4X5 array, no matter how many you increase the width to. as long as the height is 4, the number of turns will remain 7 only. But if you decrease the width from 4 to 3, number of turns depends on width now.

Now about the number of dots. If both dimensions are same and odd, then assume dimension to be 2A+1, then the number of turns will be 4*A.

If one dimension is smaller, then if the dimensions are same and even, then assume dimension to be 2*A ,then the number of turns will be 4A-2.

If the smaller dimension is even, then assume the dimension to be 2*A, then the number of turns will be 4A-1.

If the smaller dimension is odd, then assume the dimension to be 2A+1, then the number of turns will be 4A+1.

See if this works with your own new code.

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This code conditionally swaps n and m to make n <= m:

if(n>m) {
    int pom=n;
    n=m;
    m=n;
}

Given that, the condition n+1>=m is equivalent to n == m || n + 1 == m.

Note that both formulas (n-1)+(m-1) and (n-1) +(n-1)+1 give the same result for n + 1 == m.

So it is not really necessary to check whether n + 1 == m; it's only the special case n == m that matters. If n == m, then you can use the formula (n-1)+(m-1), or just 2 * n - 2. Otherwise, use the formula (n-1) +(n-1)+1, or just 2 * n - 1.

To rewrite the code:

int calculate_number_of_turns(int m, int n)
{
    if (m == n)
        return 2 * n - 2;
    else
        return 2 * std::min(m, n) - 1;
}

Edit:

If you want to write your code from scratch, without knowing the math in advance, you can write a recursive function at first.

If n = 2, it's easy to see that the answer is 3 (3 turns). If m = 2, then the answer is 2. Otherwise (assuming n > 2 and m > 2), the calculation involves invoking the same function for different arguments.

int calculate_number_of_turns(int m, int n)
{
    if (n == 2)
        return 3;
    else if (m == 2)
        return 2;
    else
        return calculate_number_of_turns(???, ???);
}

Imagine starting the path in your picture, and stopping right after you do the second turn. If you turn the picture upside-down, it's as if you reduced with and height by 1. So calling the same function for m - 1, n - 1 will calculate the number of turns left to do, in addition to the first 2 turns.

int calculate_number_of_turns(int m, int n)
{
    if (n == 2)
        return 3;
    else if (m == 2)
        return 2;
    else
        return 2 + calculate_number_of_turns(m - 1, n - 1);
}

Now, converting this recursive function to any simpler form is not too complicated (just calculate the number of times the function is going to call itself, until a termination condition holds).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input. –  John Smith Mar 3 '13 at 12:27
    
I would like to ask a question -- are these premade formulas? –  John Smith Mar 3 '13 at 20:36

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