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Hello I was asked to improve insertion sort by using binary search instead of linear. The problem is that the best case is now O(n log n) instead of O(n) due to data comparisons, which made the program if not slower in some cases equal. Here is my binary insertion sort code:

void InsertionSort(int data[], int size)
{
    int index = -1;
    for(int i = 1,temp,j;i<size;i++)
    {
        temp = data[i];//DM O(N)
        int high = i,low = 0,mid;//DM O(N)
        while(low <= high)//DC O(nlogn)
        {
            mid = (low + high) /2;
            if(temp < data[mid])
            {
                high = mid - 1;
                index = mid;
            }

            else if (temp > data[mid])
            {
                low = mid + 1;      
            }

            else if(data[mid] == temp)
            {
                index = mid;
                break; 
            } 

        }
        for(j = i;j > index;j--)
        {
            data[j] = data[j-1];//DC Worst Case O(n*n) but the exact is summation of n(n+1) / 2 nad best case o(1)
        }
        data[j] = temp;//DM O(n)
    }   
}
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But it's improved the worst case, right? –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 3 '13 at 11:12
    
@OliCharlesworth No it is still O(n * n) since it will make n(n + 1) / 2 shifts –  user1948105 Mar 3 '13 at 11:13
    
Indeed, this won't affect the asymptotic complexity, but it might improve the runtime in practice. –  Oliver Charlesworth Mar 3 '13 at 11:15
    
@OliCharlesworth in the worst case it almost produced the same time but instead of 0 ms while sorting 100000 numbers it got 16 it should be faster not slower or equal since logically binary search is much faster than linear –  user1948105 Mar 3 '13 at 11:18
    
You might see a larger speedup when sorting a type with expensive comparisons since that is what the binary search reduces. Try it on something other than plain old int. –  Blastfurnace Mar 3 '13 at 11:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can start your binary search with a biased stage that favours the best case. Instead of going directly to (low+high)/2, start at position i-1, then i-2, then i-4, i-8, i-16, i-32... until you find a smaller element, or until i-whatever gets lower than low. Then continue with the ordinary binary search.

Note that this optimisation comes at a cost. The best case ---sorted or almost sorted data--- takes O(N) time, but the average case and the worst case get a bit slower with respect to the simple binary search version.

void InsertionSort (int data[], int size)
{
    int i, j, high, low, mid, hop;
    int temp;

    for (i=1; i<size; i++)
    {
        temp = data[i];

        high = i;
        low = 0;
        hop = 1;

        do
        {
            mid = high - hop;
            hop <<= 1;

            if (temp < data[mid])
                high = mid;
            else
                low = mid + 1;
        }
        while (low+hop <= high);

        while (low != high)
        {
            mid = (low + high) / 2;

            if (temp < data[mid])
                high = mid;
            else
                low = mid + 1;
        }

        for(j=i; j>low; j--)
            data[j] = data[j-1];

        data[j] = temp;
    }   
}

Note also that high is assigned mid and not mid+1. The case where temp==data[mid] is treated exactly as the case where temp>data[mid]. This is to keep a good property of insertion sort: it is a stable sort. It makes no difference when sorting plain integers, though.

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i did not understand this part do { mid = high - hop; hop += 1; if (temp < data[mid]) high = mid; else low = mid + 1; } while (low+hop <= high); –  user1948105 Mar 6 '13 at 13:54
    
@user1948105: It is not hop+=1, but hop<<=1, which is the same as hop*=2, or hop=hop*2. The hop starts at 1 and is multiplied by 2 each time. Thus, mid starts at high-1 and then it get further by an increasing speed: high-2, high-4, high-8, ... –  comocomocomocomo Mar 21 '13 at 6:10

You can also replace the last else :else if(data[mid] == temp) with simple else because it obvious that is is true if the former two were not true...

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It will make no difference –  user1948105 Mar 4 '13 at 9:09

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