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I've been trying to do a linked list in C for a while now and managed to do so too. Now I am trying to replace my global pointers / variables to local ones, so that I pass my struct between functions. Problem is that the more I read on the subject and the more I experiment on it, the more errors and explosions inside my mind I receive.

As my code is a bit long (100 lines), I'll try to explain what it is doing and how.

I have announced a struct:

struct node {
    char Name[21];
    struct node *Next;
};

I also announced a pointer to my struct before any functions:

struct node *global;

*global is a global pointer isn't it?

Now I have three functions with new pointers inside them which handle my linked list:

void add(void); //add nodes to list with *global, *pointer and *last
    struct node *pointer *last;
void print(void); //print node inside the list with *global and *pointer
    struct node *pointer;
void quit(void); //free malloc'd list using *global and *pointer
    struct node *pointer;

It is obvious to me that I am not passing my structure in any way from a function to another function here. I am just assigning the global *global to a local pointer inside the functions, which works fine, but is not what I am trying to learn.

I've been searching for an answer for my problems but apparently I am missing something huge in the basics of C.

So, what exactly am I supposed to do here? How can I move

struct node *global;

inside my functions so that I could, for example, create a linked list inside my main function from which it would be passed to functions add, print and quit. And how do I return this list from those functions?

Also, is the original struct supposed to be in the beginning of the code or do I have to create it again inside each of the functions to avoid global pointers/variables?

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If it ain't broken don't fix it. –  Mikhail Mar 3 '13 at 13:08
    
I hope this answer is exactly what might can help you :-) –  nIcE cOw Mar 3 '13 at 13:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

struct node* global is a global pointer isn't it?

Yes the pointer is available throughout your program.

How can I move struct node *global;

inside my functions so that I could, for example, create a linked list inside my main function from which it would be passed to functions add, print and quit. And how do I return this list from those functions?

You must use a two star pointer, here is a pseudo code depicting it

struct listNode {                                      
   char data;
   struct listNode *nextPtr; // pointer to next node
};


void insert(**localptr,char item);
void remove(**localptr,char item);


int main()
{
 listnode * startptr;
 ..
 insert(&startptr,'a');
 ..
 ..
 remove(&startptr,'b');
 ..

}

In your Implementation of your insert()/remove() , you have to take the start address and navigate it through the list and after finding node take the backup of the next and previous pointers , add or remove the nodes , and then restore the previous and next pointers,

In the above code Here a start pointer is created locally in main() , and address is passed to the double star pointers in insert()/remove() , thereby eliminating the need of global pointer.

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The basic idea is, that you pass all global pointers as arguments to your functions. For instance, add becomes

void add(node *ptr, node *last);

Do this with all functions until no global variables remain.

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try defining another struct for your linkedlist like this:

struct node
{
     type value;
     node * next;
}
struct linkedList
{
    node * first;
}

void add(linkedlist a,type data){
 node * newNode ;
 newNode->value = data;
 newNode->next = a->first;
 a->first = newNode;
}

and so on...

then work with the linked list

  void main()
 {
    linkedlist a;
    type x= somevalue;
    add(a,somevalue);

}
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