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I have just started learning python and am getting caught up. I come from mostly C background.

class Alarm:

    def timer():

    def main():
    	print ("Timer has Started")

    main()

I always get a silly error when I try to run this code::

alarm > python alarm.py 
  File "alarm.py", line 5
    def main():
      ^
IndentationError: expected an indented block

What am I doing wrong?

share|improve this question
    
With all the answers available, I think it's time to pick one :p –  meder Oct 5 '09 at 9:14
    
Ummmm.... It's not possible to tell what you're hoping this will do. It's common that def main() is not part of the class. However, you've indented it. Please add some information to your question explaining what you're trying to build. A class with two methods? A class with one method and another function? What are you trying to do? –  S.Lott Oct 5 '09 at 9:57

9 Answers 9

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As others have pointed out, you have a syntax error because timer() has no body.

You don't need to use main() in python at all. Usually people use it to indicate that the file is the top level program and not a module to be imported, but it is just by convention

You may also see this idiom

def main():
    blah blah

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()

Here __name__ is a special variable. If the file has been imported it will contain the module name, so the comparison fails and main does not run.

For the top level program __name__ contains "__main__" so the main() function will be run.

This is useful because sometimes your module might run tests when it is loaded as a program but you don't want those test to run if you are importing it into a larger program

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You have an empty def

def timer():

use

def timer():
    pass

instead.

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interesting observation in how all the early answers had this incorporated yet this one has the highest # of upvotes because it just mentions that excerpt :p –  meder Oct 5 '09 at 15:07

Learn about the pass statement, main is usually not part of the class.

A global (module level) main() function is simpler than an Alarm.main() class method. Usually, main() functions come at module level.

class Alarm:

    def timer():
        pass

def main():
    print ("Timer has Started")

main()
share|improve this answer
    
Can I ask why it is not part of the class? –  Recursion Oct 5 '09 at 7:30
    
You can use methods (in a class) or functions (outside class), it's your choice. As opposed to C/C++/C#/Java, Python does not need a main method. It simply executes all code in the file (that means that it reads the classes and then executes the code that follows class definition.) –  Roman Plášil Oct 5 '09 at 7:49
    
Well, the question was obviously a beginner's, and a global (module level) main() function is simpler than an Alarm.main() class method. Usually, main() functions come at module level. –  gimel Oct 5 '09 at 9:29

I think you want to use __init__ though, which is the constructor...

class Alarm:

    def timer(self): 
        print('timer has started')

    def __init__(self): 
        print('constructor')
        self.timer()


x = Alarm()

constructor

timer has started

My example differs from the others in that I'm actually instantiating a new object.

Notes:

  • specify self as the first argument to any method defined in the class
  • __init__ is the method to define for the constructor
  • invoke the class by doing variableName = className() like you would invoke a function, no new keyword
  • if you have an empty function, use the pass keyword like def foo(self): pass
share|improve this answer
    
So in python a new instance is not automatically instantiated as in java or C#. You must instantiate it manually? –  Recursion Oct 5 '09 at 7:35
    
As far as I know, that's the only practical way to do it. –  meder Oct 5 '09 at 7:38
    
I recommend reading about __init__ and self @ docs.python.org/tutorial/classes.html –  meder Oct 5 '09 at 7:40
    
@Recursion: No object is automatically instantiated in Java/C#. It's the same in Python. Maybe you meant the static method main in the startup class? –  Roman Plášil Oct 5 '09 at 7:47
    
@Roman: I was refering to Classes. In Java you dont need to instantiate your first class, it is done for you. You then have a constructor to start off with. From my reading python has no instructor. –  Recursion Oct 5 '09 at 7:50

Invoking main() will give an undefined function error, as it is a Alarm method.

IMHO the right form you should use is the following:

class Alarm:
    def timer():
      pass

    @staticmethod
    def main():
      print ("Timer has Started")

if __name__ == "__main__" :
    Alarm.main()
share|improve this answer
    
I get the following error python alarm.py File "alarm.py", line 12 Alarm::main() ^ SyntaxError: invalid syntax –  Recursion Oct 5 '09 at 7:51
    
Sorry, too many languages at the same time for me, corrected :) –  AlberT Oct 5 '09 at 7:57

try deindent main() and add pass to timer and define an init method:

class Alarm():

    def __init__(self):
        print ("Timer has Started")

<shell>$  Alarm()
share|improve this answer
    
wouldn't this error out because main is undefined? well, I guess that's what the OP was intending for. –  meder Oct 5 '09 at 7:33
    
main is totally a non-sense in this implementation, you are already using __init__() with the same intent of the original main() –  AlberT Oct 5 '09 at 7:58
    
You were right! –  DrFalk3n Oct 5 '09 at 8:07

Your timer function is not defined. (And your space/tab indentation may be mixed)

See the tutorial (classes) for more details on classes.

class Alarm:

    def timer(self):
        pass
    def main(self):
        print ("Timer has Started")

if __name__ == '__main__':
    class_inst = Alarm()
    class_inst.main()

If you getting into python read PEP8.
Also, using pylint helps, it will point out indentation and many other errors you'll run across before you 'execute' your code.

share|improve this answer
    
If you would had used pylint it would had told you that main() is undefined, in fact. –  AlberT Oct 5 '09 at 7:59

In Python, you don't need to define everything as a class. There's nothing to encapsulate in this code, so there's no reason to define an Alarm class. Just have the functions in a module.

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Thanks for all the help everybody. I was making a little alarm/timer to remind me to get up and take a walk every now and then. I got most of it working, and it works great. Checked it against a stop watch and it works great.

import time

def timer(num):
    seconds = num*60
    print (num , "minutes", seconds , "seconds")

    while (seconds > 0):
    	print (seconds, "seconds")
    	time.sleep(1)
    	seconds = seconds-1

    print ("Time to get up and take a WALK!!!!")
    main()


def main():
    number = input("Input time : ")
    int(number)
    timer(number)


if __name__ == '__main__':
    main()
share|improve this answer
    
next exercise: make main a loop that repeats forever (e.g., while True), and break out of the loop if the user just hits 'enter' rather than inputting a number. –  foosion Oct 5 '09 at 20:08

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