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My problem, i create one 'Class A' which updates and handles values. 'Class B' is created within 'Class A', and just needs to read the values of Class A.

Now i could create the values of class A as:

public static int AInt { get { return aInt; } }
static int aInt;

And access them within B as A.AInt.

However i could use pointers but this seems very anti-c#.

public class A
{
    int aInt;

    unsafe public A()
    {
        fixed(int *aPtr = &aInt)
        B b = new B(aPtr);
    }

    // Changes aInt
}

unsafe public class B
{
    int *bInt;

    public B(int *a)
    {
        bInt = a;
    }

    // Does stuff according to bInt value changes
}

I'm a little confused as to a better approach of supplying one class' value to another without explicitly calling an update method for the values. I feel the first example is how it should be done, but i'm from a c++ background so pointers are the norm for me.

To do pointers just seems too messy in c# as you have to change compilation flags and have to change any variable with the fixed() and mark a method/class as unsafe.

Thanks for any guidance/tips for a better solution.

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closed as not a real question by Henk Holterman, TimothyP, hauleth, PaRiMaL RaJ, X.L.Ant Mar 4 '13 at 8:34

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Don't use unsafe unless you really need or you're 100% sure it's a right way to do a thing. For your example - it isn't. –  MarcinJuraszek Mar 3 '13 at 15:53
    
Both ways work but it did seem unneccessary. Thank you for you quick reply. –  NomeSkavinski Mar 3 '13 at 15:57
    
What is the actual problem/question? "access them within B as A.AInt" seems OK. –  Henk Holterman Mar 3 '13 at 15:58
1  
Your question is unclear. Please read it again and edit it to make it more clear. –  Phillip Scott Givens Mar 3 '13 at 16:04
1  
Might also be better suited for programmers.stackexchange.com –  TimothyP Mar 4 '13 at 1:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are plenty of ways of doing this as you have noticed. If aInt will remain a static variable (read: i mean it wont change, not static type) then you can just pass it into B via a constructor or a property, or you can pass the whole object into B.

B b = new B(this.aInt); //this is A

or

B b = new B(this); //this is A

If you expect aInt to change and B to get notified then you can create an event in A and subscribe to it in B.

If you expect aInt to be different, but you will let B poll for aInt out of A you can pass a Func delegate into B and have that Func return aInt to you.

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2  
downvotes with no explanation are weird. –  Stan R. Mar 3 '13 at 16:01
    
Ah yes, i could use a delegate to ask for the value. I didn't think of that even though i am using them for my controller input. Thanks alot. –  NomeSkavinski Mar 3 '13 at 16:03
    
I didnt downvote, i voted up. –  NomeSkavinski Mar 3 '13 at 16:04
1  
@NomeSkavinski I wasn't talking about you, I was talking about whoever downvoted me first. I don't mind being downvoted as long as there is an explanation of what's wrong. –  Stan R. Mar 3 '13 at 16:05

You should rather pass reference to whole A object, not certain property within that object:

public class A
{
    public int aInt;

    public A()
    {
        B b = new B(this);
    }

    // Changes aInt
}

public class B
{
    A _a;

    public B(A a)
    {
        _a = a;
    }

    // can use _a.aInt here
}

Or create an event in A and subscribe to that event in B

share|improve this answer
    
Would this be a viable approach even though there will only ever be One of A? A is also the entry point and is quite a large object, but as it passing a reference it wont be an issue. –  NomeSkavinski Mar 3 '13 at 16:01
    
If there will only be one A why don't make it static? With static class you don't have to pass anything, just access properties using A.aInt. –  MarcinJuraszek Mar 3 '13 at 16:03
    
That is very true, seeing as B wont exist unless A exists anyway. I wish i could mark more than one answer, these are all excellent. Thank you. –  NomeSkavinski Mar 3 '13 at 16:10

Not sure what you want to do within class B, but eventuall a simple extension class is enough:

public class A
{
    int aInt;

    public A()
    {
        aInt = 1;
        aInt = aInt.DoSomething();
        // aInt is now 6
    }
}

public static class Extension
{
    public static int DoSomething (this int value)
    {
        return value += 5;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice, i like. Definitely keep extensions in mind for future issues, thank you for bringing this to my attention. –  NomeSkavinski Mar 3 '13 at 16:07
    
Extensions are a much overseen feature of C# –  Alina B. Mar 3 '13 at 16:08

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