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I'm trying to read 3 floats. I tried to do this with floats and doubles, but I get the same behavior with both.

Input example:

3 1 2
32.0 54.7 -2

3 integers on first line, 3 floats on second line:

How I'm reading:

vector<int> order;
vector<double> numbers;
unsigned int order_number;
double number;
char input_character;

while (true)
{
  scanf("%d", &order_number);
  order.push_back(order_number);

  scanf("%c", &input_character);

  if (input_character == ' ')
    continue;
  else
    break;
}

while (true)
{
  scanf("%lf", &number);
  numbers.push_back(number);

  scanf("%c", &input_character);

  if (input_character == ' ')
    continue;
  else
    break;
}

printf("%d %d %d\n", order[0], order[1], order[2]);
printf("%lf %lf %lf\n", numbers[0], numbers[1], numbers[2]);

When printing them, I get:

32.000000 54.700000 -2.000000

I wanted just 32.0, 54.7 and -2. I know I can specify how many decimal places to print with %.x, but I need to print as many as were given to me in the input.

Also, those while (true) loops are there because I don't know how many numbers I'm going to get.

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1  
floating point is inaccurate by design. 32.0 could easily go to 31.999999999999999 which means returning exactly what you input it impossible with any sort of floating point ... –  Goz Mar 3 '13 at 16:21
2  
So read them as string –  deepmax Mar 3 '13 at 16:23
    
try changing "%lf" to "%2lf" –  TravellingGeek Mar 3 '13 at 16:26
1  
@Goz 32.0 is exactly representable in every floating point format I've used, including the IEEE 754 binary formats. However, your point does apply to 54.7. It is not exactly representable in any binary format. –  Patricia Shanahan Mar 3 '13 at 17:00
    
If you're programming in C++, why not use std::cout and std::cin for output and input? –  Joachim Pileborg Mar 3 '13 at 17:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

What you want is not possible with plain floating point types. If you want to print the numbers with the same number of decimal places as the input, you have to:

  • Read the input as a string.
  • Parse it yourself and save the number of decimal places.
  • Use that when you print it again.
share|improve this answer

When you using scanf("%d",...) it reads characters and parses them into a int.

If you want show them as they input, you have to store them as strings.

And if you need to use them as double then convert them to numbers.

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