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I've seen this practice in the php docs:

$foo = function() {
    echo 'foo';
}

$foo();

Why would you do that instead of just:

function foo()
{
    echo 'foo';
}

foo();
share|improve this question
7  
see Anonymous functions – Federico Mar 3 '13 at 16:55
    
You would do this so that you'll be able to pass that function around from object to object... – Lix Mar 3 '13 at 16:57
    
Sometimes anonymous functions are very usefull. For example you have a form and you need to validate some field. You are certain, that you will not need this function anywhere, but here and you need to pass callable argument. IMO anonymous functions are way to go in such situation. – Eugene Mar 3 '13 at 16:58
    
There are convenience advantages beyond storing them in variables. Mostly they're used for not cluttering the global namespace with one-off callbacks. – mario Mar 3 '13 at 16:58
up vote 8 down vote accepted

They're useful in a few ways. Personally I use them because they're easier to control than actual functions.

But also, anonymous functions can do this:

$someVar = "Hello, world!";
$show = function() use ($someVar) {
    echo $someVar;
}
$show();

Anonymous functions can "import" variables from the outside scope. The best part is that it's safe to use in loops (unlike JavaScript) because it takes a copy of the variable to use with the function, unless you specifically tell it to pass by reference with use (&$someVar)

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4  
An example of it being used in a loop might be useful. – MichaelRushton Mar 3 '13 at 17:28
    
the use command, lifesaver! – Oritm Jan 15 '14 at 12:07
    
fyi - if you're skimming for the best answer, i would say the highly upvoted comment above by @Laxus is also very helpful (if not more so) – cwd Sep 8 '14 at 18:17

It's also often used to pass callbacks to functions such as array_map and many others

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It is extremely useful in some particular cases. For example

Server::create('/')
    ->addGetRoute('test', function(){
        return 'Yay!';
})

The above code snippet is an example of simple routing in a REST based application.

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