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I am trying to understand why the first query would be faster than the second:

SELECT * FROM DBADMIN.CR_TICKET WHERE QUEUE_ID=005555 AND STATUS=4

and

SELECT TICKET_ID FROM DBADMIN.CR_TICKET WHERE QUEUE_ID=005555 AND STATUS=4

The first takes about a minute to run and returns all fields. The second I just stopp after several minutes because its taking too long. TICKET_ID is valid column name. I'm new to databases and sql and using vb.net with a reference to oracle instant client 11.

Using connection As New OracleConnection()
        Dim command As OracleCommand = connection.CreateCommand()
        Dim reader As OracleDataReader = command.ExecuteReader()
        Dim str As String
        Dim strFieldName As String
        Dim strFieldType As String
        Dim sql As String = "SELECT * FROM DBADMIN.CR_TICKET WHERE QUEUE_ID=005555 AND STATUS=4"

        connection.ConnectionString = connectionString
        connection.Open()

        command.CommandText = sql

        While reader.Read()
            str = ""
            strFieldName = ""
            strFieldType = ""

            For e = 0 To reader.FieldCount - 1
                strFieldName = reader.GetName(e)
                strFieldType = reader.GetDataTypeName(e)
                str = str & strFieldName & " " & strFieldType & ": " & reader(e).ToString & vbCrLf

            Next

            Console.Write(str & vbCrLf & vbCrLf)
        End while

UPDATE 3/4/13:

First of all thank you for the excellent advice, I was able to get sql plus to run eventually and return the following execution plans. I did a lot of reading yesterday and found that one the reasons my queries were slow is that the columns I'm searching are not indexed. I discovered that the primary key column (which exists in every table) is by default indexed. I changed my sql string to:

SQL> SELECT * FROM DBADMIN.CR_TICKET WHERE TICKET_ID > 'CR00000000' AND STATUS=4 AND (QUEUE_ID=005555 OR QUEUE_ID=005556) ORDER BY PRIORITY, TROUBLE_START;


| Id  | Operation                    | Name        | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)

| Time     |

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------

|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT             |             |     1 |   401 |     6  (17)

| 00:00:01 |

|   1 |  SORT ORDER BY               |             |     1 |   401 |     6  (17)

| 00:00:01 |

|*  2 |   TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| CR_TICKET   |     1 |   401 |     5   (0)

| 00:00:01 |

|*  3 |    INDEX RANGE SCAN          | CRT_TID_IDX |     1 |       |     4   (0)

 | 00:00:01 |

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This is running quite a bit faster. I learned that my original queries were reading every single record in the database in order to match my statement. By structuring the query a little differently to include an Indexed column it essentially only searches a fraction of the main database.

SQL> SELECT * FROM DBADMIN.CR_TICKET WHERE QUEUE_ID=005555 AND STATUS=4 AND PRIORITY=1;

| Id  | Operation                   | Name         | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)

| Time     |

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------

|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |              |     1 |   401 | 14864   (1)

| 00:02:59 |

|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| CR_TICKET    |     1 |   401 | 14864   (1)

| 00:02:59 |

|*  2 |   INDEX RANGE SCAN          | CRT_STAT_IDX |   230K|       |   408   (2)

| 00:00:05 |



SQL> SELECT DBADMIN.CR_TICKET.TICKET_ID FROM DBADMIN.CR_TICKET WHERE    QUEUE_ID=005555     AND STATUS=4 AND PRIORITY=1;


| Id  | Operation                   | Name         | Rows  | Bytes | Cost (%CPU)

| Time     |

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

------------

|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT            |              |     1 |    24 | 14845   (1)

| 00:02:59 |

|*  1 |  TABLE ACCESS BY INDEX ROWID| CR_TICKET    |     1 |    24 | 14845   (1)

| 00:02:59 |

|*  2 |   INDEX RANGE SCAN          | CRT_STAT_IDX |   230K|       |   408   (2)

| 00:00:05 |

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

UPDATE 5/25/13

Thanks for the offer of help, I appreciate it. I've finally had a chnace to revisit this project and tried your suggested queries. The first one ran fine, the second two didn't return any results. You mentioned about an indexing function. Would this be creating a permanent index on the database? I'd prefer not to do that.

select status, priority, count(*)
from dbadmin.cr_ticket
group by status, priority;

dbQuery1

share|improve this question
4  
Have you compared execution plans for the two queries? –  Matt Ball Mar 3 '13 at 18:17
    
I honestly don't know what that means... I'm looking into it. –  jmyns Mar 3 '13 at 18:37
1  
It's just a guess, but I don't see that you have closed the connection. The two queries should have the same explain plan. –  BellevueBob Mar 3 '13 at 18:52
1  
The columns you select have no bearing on execute speed. Perhaps speed across the network to your application - but as far as the database is concerned, it's coughing up based on an execution plan, which is like GPS in your car telling you the fastest way to go. The plan doesn't care what car you drive, but what streets you are taking (WHERE clause). –  Trent Mar 3 '13 at 19:12
2  
If you are at a SQL*Plus client connection, do you observe the same disparity for the two queries? –  DCookie Mar 3 '13 at 19:51

1 Answer 1

We need an explain plan on both queries in order to give you a real answer.

To get an explain plan you can connect to the database through SQL*Plus and type the following:

set lines 155
set page 999
explain plan for
SELECT * 
  FROM DBADMIN.CR_TICKET 
 WHERE QUEUE_ID=005555 
   AND STATUS=4;

@?/rdbms/admin/utlxpls

It is not dangerous to do the above, you are not modifying anything. You're not even running the actual query. If you have graphical tool like SQL Developer or Toad, you can just select the code and you should be able to find "show explain plan" in a menu. In Toad you can hit ctrl+e.

Right now I suspect that the statistics are out of date on the table or indexes. You may have an index including "TICKED_ID", which looks "good" to Oracle when in fact it isn't. Changing to "SELECT *" would most likely mean that there are no "covering" index to use, and Oracle may pick another more suitable index instead.

Again, this is just guess work. Give us the plans for both queries and we'll help you :)

Edited 2013-03-05

You should probably not do WHERE TICKET_ID > 'CR00000000', since it assumes a certain format. If you insert a record with TICKET_ID='A1' it will not work for example.

Without knowing more, I'd say an index on {queue_id, priority} would probably be a good candidate. But, if your data looks like I think it does, then only a tiny subset has status = 4, and then you should benefit from using a function based index instead.

It would look like this:

create index dbadmin.cr_ticket_fbx_stat_4
    on dbadmin.cr_ticket(case when status = 4 then 4 end);

The difference between this index and a normal index on the status column, is that here only the rows with status = 4 will actually get indexed. So if your table has 1,000,000 rows, and only 1,000 rows have status = 4, only 1,000 entries would exist in the index. It would be really tiny. To use the index you would need to write the query as:

select *
  from dbadmin.cr_ticket
 where (case when status = 4 then 4 end) = 4;

If you could provide the results for the following queries, I could give you some more advice:

select status, priority, count(*)
  from dbadmin.cr_ticket
group by status, priority;

select avg(count(*)), median(count(*)), min(count(*)), max(count(*))
  from dbadmin.cr_ticket
 group by queue_id;

select count(*), count(distinct queue_id)
  from dbadmin.cr_ticket; 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the advice, I updated my post with the requested execution plans. This database holds a lot of records and I'm only really interested in about 100-200 of them. I'm building a dashboard which provides an (almost live) view of the current queue status. I think I'll end up running this query and updating a local table once per minute, and then have my web service running off the local table. Does that sound like something a real developer might do (haha)! –  jmyns Mar 4 '13 at 17:46
    
Thanks @Ronnis, I've updated per your request. What is the purpose of that second query? –  jmyns May 25 '13 at 4:28

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