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If you have a private static nested class in Java, is it still recommended to use getters and setters rather than direct field access?

An example. Direct field access:

public class Application {
    private List<MyInnerClass> myInnerClassList;

    // ...

    public void foo() {
        MyInnerClass inner = new MyInnerClass();
        inner.bar = 50;
        myInnerClassList.add(inner);
    }

    private static class MyInnerClass {
        private int bar;
    }
}

vs encapsulation:

public class Application {
    private List<MyInnerClass> myInnerClassList;

    // ...

    public void foo() {
        MyInnerClass inner = new MyInnerClass();
        inner.setBar(50);
        myInnerClassList.add(inner);
    }

    private static class MyInnerClass {
        private int bar;

        public int getBar() {
            return bar;
        }

        public void setBar(int bar) {
            this.bar = bar;
        }
    }
}
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Encapsulation is usually a good thing, keeps classes independent from one another (e.g. you might want to change how you assign bar). But also depends on what you want to do with MyInnerClass. –  m0skit0 Mar 3 '13 at 18:22
1  
if nobody else gets access to that innerclass than the outer class containing it, it is relatively easy to refactor it if the need arises to use getters and setters. so i would just use a plain variable. –  Markus Mikkolainen Mar 3 '13 at 18:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Depends but generally I think it is ok. One of the main reasons to use getters and setters is to hide implementation details from the user of the class so you can easily change implementation without affecting the user.

In the case of a private inner class, this is not an issue because you are both the writer and the user of the class, and no one from outside can use it.

If you just use to hold some data together, not having getters and setters will make the code shorter and more readable.

But, if the inner class is bigger and more complicated (which is usually not the case), then you should consider using getters/setters. This will enable you, e.g., to add bounds checking to bar in your code.

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It is recommended, because at some point it may make sense to refactor and move the class outside. Also, it may be desired to make an interface for it, and so on. There are probably more reasons as well.

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2  
At the point where you move it, you could add getters and setters. –  Eric Mar 3 '13 at 18:33

Per the Java Tutorials: "A static nested class interacts with the instance members of its outer class (and other classes) just like any other top-level class. In effect, a static nested class is behaviorally a top-level class that has been nested in another top-level class for packaging convenience."

So I'd say yes, you generally want to encapsulate its members just like you would for a top-level class.

share|improve this answer
    
The important point here is that the class is private, so should not be treated like a top-level class. –  Eric Mar 3 '13 at 18:40

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