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How can we declare a non static const array as an attribute to class. Following code produces compilation error (“'Test::x' : member could not be initialized”)?

class Test
{
public:
 const int x[10];

public:
 Test()
 {
 }
};
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I need to store some configuration data which is available at the time of compilation. I want this to be placed in a read-only region of storage. –  Vadakkumpadath Oct 5 '09 at 10:35

3 Answers 3

You should read this already posted question. Since it is not possible to do what you want, the workaround is to use an std::vector.

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Thaks for reply. But that solution is not possible in case of arrays. When we are initializing arrays, we will get another compilation error ("cannot specify explicit initializer for arrays"). –  Vadakkumpadath Oct 5 '09 at 9:23
    
I have edited my reply. I had linked the wrong question. Please take a look at it again. –  Ashwin Oct 5 '09 at 9:33
    
std::vector is not the same. It allocates memory on the heap. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Oct 5 '09 at 10:07
    
I want this to be initialized in a read-only region of storage. Will it be possible with std::vector? –  Vadakkumpadath Oct 5 '09 at 10:37
1  
You wan't a dynamically allocated object which allocates memory in a read only region. This is not possible, the memory in the read-only region needs to be initialized at compile time, but at compile time it is not known how many objects you will create. –  hirschhornsalz Oct 5 '09 at 10:51

You could use array class from tr1.

class Test
{
public:
 const array<int, 10> x;

public:
 Test(array<int,10> val) : x(val) // the only place to initialize x since it is const
 {
 }
};

array class could be simplistically represented as follows:

template<typename T, int S>
class array
{
    T ar[S];
public:
    // constructors and operators
};
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Using boost::array (the same as tr1) it will looks like:

    #include<boost/array.hpp>

    class Test
    {   
       public:

        Test():constArray(staticConst) {}; 
        Test( boost::array<int,4> const& copyThisArray):constArray(copyThisArray) {}; 

        static const boost::array<int,4> staticConst; 

        const boost::array<int,4> constArray;
    };

    const boost::array<int,4> Test::staticConst = { { 1, 2, 3 ,5 } };

The extra code static member is needed because { { 1, 2, 3 ,5 } } is invalid in initialization list.

Some advantages is that boost::array have defined iterator and standard container methods like size, begin and end.

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array from tr1 has iterator and standard methods like size/begin/end as well. No need to use boost for just one simple class. –  Kirill V. Lyadvinsky Oct 5 '09 at 10:33
    
You right. But I use boost everywhere before any tr1 implementation. –  Arpegius Oct 5 '09 at 11:04

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