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Assume that we have some methods that do some big work.

Initially we don`t know how many methods there are ( can be 1 and can be 10 ).

In code this looks like this:

public interface IWorker
{
    void DoWork(DataContainer data);
}

And several classes that implement this interface. Then we have list of instances.

List<IWorker> workers = new List<IWorker>();

I want to run these methods asynchronously. In addition I want some callback when all of them are executed.

public void Callback()
{
    Console.WriteLine("everything done");
}

Is there a way to do this without writing custom wrappers or so? With ThreadPool, Tasks, Parallel?

As I know Parrallel block thread untill tasks are completed so this is not a prefferd behaviour.

When creating Task there should be method without parameters as I`ve seen so this is not good as well.

In ThreadPool there is possibility to use method QueueUserWorkItem, but using this method I won`t get a single "total-completion" callback.

Of course, I can make my own wrapper that will implement the desired functionality using ThreadPool, but the goal is to make this without writing such one.

Can anyone help please? Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're looking for the TPL and the Task class.

Create a Task for each operation, then call Task.WhenAll to get an aggregate task

share|improve this answer
    
yes, that sounds good, but Task in its constructor awaits a method without input parameters. And my methods have such one. –  steavy Mar 3 '13 at 20:10
1  
@steavy There's no need to supply input parameters to the task because you shouldn't need to be scheduling the task after it's created, in other works, there is no need for the task scheduler to have anything to give the delegate. Instead, just close over any variables you might needs as parameters for your function using a lambda rather than passing the values directly. –  Servy Mar 3 '13 at 20:15
    
thanks. Since you were first one to suggest Task.WhenAll marked as correct answer :) –  steavy Mar 3 '13 at 20:28

You're looking for Task.WhenAll. Create a bunch of Tasks that do what you want them to, then wait on all of the tasks and ContinueWith your callback. I split out an async version of the DoWork method - if you're always going to be calling it asynchronously you don't necessarily need to do that.

public interface IWorker
{
    Task DoWorkAsync(string data);
    void DoWork(string data);
}

public class Worker : IWorker
{
    public Task DoWorkAsync(string data)
    {
        return Task.Run(() => DoWork(data));
    }

    public void DoWork(string data)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(data);
        Thread.Sleep(100);
    }
}

public class Runner
{
    public void Callback()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Everything done");
    }

    public void Run()
    {
        var workers = new List<IWorker> {new Worker(), new Worker(), new Worker()};
        var tasks = workers.Select(t => t.DoWorkAsync("some data"));

        Task.WhenAll(tasks).ContinueWith(task => Callback());

        Console.WriteLine("Waiting");
    }
}
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Sounds like a prime candidate for the CountdownEvent class:

List<IWorker> workers = new List<IWorker>();
using (CountdownEvent e = new CountdownEvent(workers.Count))
{
    foreach (IWorker worker in workers)
    {
        // Dynamically increment signal count.
        e.AddCount();
        // run work itself on another thread
        ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(delegate(object state)
        {
            try
            {
                ((IWorker)state[0]).DoWork((DataContainer)state[1]);
            }
            finally
            {
                e.Signal();
            }
        },
        // pass required parameters for block of work
        new object[] { worker, dataForWorker });
    }

    // wait for all workers to finish
    e.Wait();
    // run callback code
}
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