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Okay, I'm stymied on how to pull a value out of a void type to bring it back to main using a reference variable. I've read the section in my textbook several times but the code snips it gives don't make sense to me and there aren't very many of them. Could someone possibly explain, or give a simple code example?

Thanks

Here is the code I have, what is supposed to happen is I'm supposed to pull 5 test scores from the user using the first function called by my main. The next function called by main is supposed to call a third function which determines the lowest of the test scores and removes it from the middle function's calculations.

I tried running the code (using just text stubs and the variables without calculations) but my variables all show up as that huge number that is the maximum they can be, not the user input they're SUPPOSED to show up as.

#include <iostream>
#include <cmath>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
double score1, score2, score3, score4, score5, average;

void getScore(double &);
void calcAverage(double &);
int findLowest();

getScore(score1);
getScore(score2);
getScore(score3);
getScore(score4);
getScore(score5);

calcAverage(average);

cout<<"Let's see what we have here.\n"            <<score1<<endl<<score2<<endl<<score3<<endl<<score4<<endl<<score5<<endl<<average;
system("pause");
return 0;
}

void getScore(double &)
{
double score;

cout<<"Please enter a test score.";
    cin>>score;
    while(score<0 || score>100)
    {
        cout<<"Please enter a valid score.";
        cin>>score;
    }
}

void calcAverage(double &)
{
int findLowest();
double lowest;

cout<<"Yes, I'm a stub.";
lowest = findLowest();
}

int findLowest()
{
cout<<"I'm a stub too!";
return 5;
}
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closed as not a real question by Roman R., Seva Titov, Wouter J, billz, Mario Mar 3 '13 at 22:18

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
You should explain what exactly it is you don't understand. Otherwise, we're just guessing at what you mean. –  Nikos C. Mar 3 '13 at 20:24
1  
Not sure what you mean by "pull a value out of a void type to bring it back to main using a reference". Can you elaborate more on what it is you're trying to do? (don't use the book's terms; just say it). –  WhozCraig Mar 3 '13 at 20:24
    
Ugh. I edited it then accidently clicked the rollback. Let me do that one more time........ –  Heather T Mar 3 '13 at 20:51
    
There. Edited to include the code that I have. –  Heather T Mar 3 '13 at 20:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your functions should be written like this:

void getScore(double &refScore) //!!
{
    //double score;

    cout<<"Please enter a test score.";

    cin>>refScore;
    while(refScore<0 || refScore>100)
    {
        cout<<"Please enter a valid score.";
        cin>>refScore;
    }
}

I think you get the idea..

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Thank you, it's hard to tell in the textbook sometimes what is ACTUALLY part of the syntax, and what is just the author's variables. –  Heather T Mar 3 '13 at 21:10

I think the best way of explaining the idea of references is thinking of a reference as an alias. It is not 100% true, but for starters it is a very good allegory.

Whatever you do to the reference is also done to the original object.

So all you do is defining an alternative name for the same variable.

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I get what it is, what I don't understand is the syntax to use it. :) –  Heather T Mar 3 '13 at 20:57

Reference is an another name (alias) of the existing object, so one can references only existing objects (must be initilized) and cannot be reassigned to other object. The const pointer meets these conditions and is used by the compiler to represents references. Hope it is clear.

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