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Literally, I have been asked this question ""The Fibonacci sequence is 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, … ; the first two terms are 0 and 1, and each term thereafter is the sum of the two preceding terms – i.e., Fib[n] = Fib[n – 1] + Fib[n – 2]. Using this information, write a C++ program that calculates the nth number in a Fibonacci sequence, where the user enters n in the program interactively. For example, if n = 6, the program should display the value 8."

Thanks for the answers to the previous question, I have put it into my full code. I did have a loop that meant the User could chose whether to continue the program or not. It was working earlier, but now nothing happens. Can anyone shed any light on this? Thanks

{int N;

char ans = 'C';

while (toupper(ans) == 'C')
{
    cout<<"This program is designed to give the user any value of the Fibonacci Sequence that they desire, provided the number is a positive integer.";//Tell user what the program does

    cout<<"\n\nThe formula of the Fibonacci Sequence is;   Fib[N] = Fib[N – 1] + Fib[N – 2]\n\n"; //Declare the Formula for the User

    cout<<"Enter a value for N, then press Enter:"; //Declare Value that the User wants to see

    cin>>N;//Enter the Number

    if (N>1) {
            long u = 0, v = 1, t;

            for(int Variable=2; Variable<=N; Variable++)
            {
                t = u + v;
                u = v;
                v = t;
            } //Calculate the Answer

        cout<<"\n\nThe "<<N<<"th Number of the Fibonacci Sequence is: "<<t; //Show the Answer
    }

    if (N<0) {
        cout<<"\n\nThe value N must be a POSITIVE integer, i.e. N > 0"; //Confirm that N must be a positive integer. Loop.
    }
    if (N>100) {
        cout<<"\n\nThe value for N must be less than 100, i.e. N < 100. N must be between 0 - 100.";//Confirm that N must be less than 100. Loop.
    }
    if (N==0) {
        cout<<"\n\nFor your value of N, \nFib[0] = 0"; //Value will remain constant throughout, cannot be caculated through formula. Loop.
    }
    if (N==1) {
        cout<<"\n\nFor your value of N. \nFib[1]=1";//Value will remain constant throughout, cannot be caculated through formula. Loop.
    }

  cout << "\n\nIf you want to select a new value for N, then click C then press Enter. If you want to quit, click P then press Enter: ";
    cin >> ans;
}


return 0;

}

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by deepmax, seva titov, Rapptz, sashoalm, tkone Mar 4 '13 at 19:07

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
What have you tried? – Oliver Charlesworth Mar 3 '13 at 20:33
6  
Move cout out of the loop. – Drew Dormann Mar 3 '13 at 20:33
    
extra { after else ?? – exexzian Mar 3 '13 at 20:36

All You need is to put cout 2 lines below. And you don't need extra {}, but it does not harm.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay that worked, thank you very much! Is it possible you could explain to me how? Just looking to understand what actually happened ... – Craig Mar 3 '13 at 20:44
    
As you can see you have cout inside your loop. So with every circle you count next value and print it. All you need is just to count. You print only the last value, after the loop. – Fuv Mar 3 '13 at 20:48
    
Thanks again! Updated full code as shown above, still a slight problem tho... – Craig Mar 3 '13 at 21:03
    
As far as I see it works. What's the problem? – Fuv Mar 3 '13 at 21:08
    
It works now, sorry for that. The slight problem that is appearing is some numbers appear to come negative... but it appears to be a random assortment of numbers e.g. 100, 193, while most of the others are correct. (I changed the limit for N to 300). I just have a question about this, cause this was after I removed the 'unsigned long ' part from the equation. Does this influence the negatives? And if so, how? I also have a question about the "for(int Variable=2; Variable<N; Variable++)" part. It is a group project and someone else created that part, and can't explain it. Can you? Thanks – Craig Mar 3 '13 at 21:28

This is your main loop:

for(int i=2; i<=N; i++)
{
    t = u + v;
    u = v;
    v = t;

    cout<<t<<"is your answer";
}

It should be obvious that it is printing out your answer on every pass in the loop.

Just move the print to outside the loop... after all calculations are done, and you'll just see it printed once:

for(int i=2; i<=N; i++)
{
    t = u + v;
    u = v;
    v = t;
}
cout<<t<<"is your answer";

Other problems I see with your code:

You declare a function:

unsigned long long Fib(int N);

But it is never defined or used at all. Why is this declaration here? (remove it)

You have a redundant set of braces:

else {
        {
            unsigned long long u = 0, v = [....]

You don't need braces immediately followed by more braces.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for that, I have tidied it up now. I also removed the unsigned long from "else { { unsigned long long u = 0, v = [....] As they didn't seem to be anything. I got that function from the lecturers notes....why does it not make a difference? – Craig Mar 3 '13 at 20:58

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