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I have two dictionaries (Python), which I am merging based on the value (not key). However, my approach is very inefficient, essentially O(n^2). Is there a better way to go about it?

The dictionary in this case is essentially an integer key, the value is a tuple (5 elements long), all integers.

thanks!

Example:

Dictionary A: {25: (1, 5, 1, 5), 34: (5, 24, 5, 24)}

Dictionary B: {46: (1, 5, 1, 5), 29: (5, 23, 1, 5)}.

The merged dictionary is: {25: (1, 5, 1, 5), 34: (5, 24, 5, 24), 29: (5, 23, 1, 5)}. Note that the first element of dictionary A has same value tuple of first element of dictionary B therefore, we only select one

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3  
Could you elaborate a bit about this "value merging"? For instance you could post two example dictionaries and the desired result for the merged dictinoary. Is there a bijection between keys and values? –  Hyperboreus Mar 3 '13 at 21:19
    
Sure, Dictionary A: {25: 1, 5, 1, 5}, {34: 5, 24, 5, 24} Dictionary B: {46: 1, 5, 1, 5}, {29: 5, 23, 1, 5}. The merged dictionary will be: {25: 1, 5, 1, 5}, {34: 5, 24, 5, 24}, {29: 5, 23, 1, 5}. Note that the first element of dictionary A has same value tuple of first element of dictionary B therefore, we only select one. –  user308827 Mar 3 '13 at 21:20
3  
@OP, better edit your question and don't add comments. –  Hyperboreus Mar 3 '13 at 21:20
    
@OP A: {25: 1, 5, 1, 5} is not a dictionary. Did you maybe mean A = {25: (1, 5, 1, 5) }? –  Hyperboreus Mar 3 '13 at 21:22
1  
@OP: On which basis do you decide whether to keep key 25 or key 46? –  Hyperboreus Mar 3 '13 at 21:25

3 Answers 3

Something like this maybe?

a = {25: (1, 5, 1, 5), 34: (5, 24, 5, 24)}
b = {46: (1, 5, 1, 5), 29: (5, 23, 1, 5)}

for k, v in b.items ():
    if v not in a.values (): a [k] = v

print (a)

But I guess it is still O(n**2).

EDIT: This should be faster for large dictionaries:

c = {}
for k, v in a.items (): c [v] = k
for k, v in b.items (): c [v] = k

c = dict ( (b, a) for a, b in c.items () )
print (c)
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Also, please use a.iteritems() to avoid creating a new list of the items in the dict. –  JCash Mar 3 '13 at 22:10

I'd probably do something like this:

from collections import defaultdict

A = {25: (1, 5, 1, 5), 34: (5, 24, 5, 24)}
B = {46: (1, 5, 1, 5), 29: (5, 23, 1, 5)}

vk = defaultdict(list)
sources = A, B
for source in sources:
    for k,v in source.iteritems():
        vk[v].append(k)

out = {v[0]:k for k,v in vk.iteritems()}

which will always take the earliest key in sources, and produces

>>> out
{25: (1, 5, 1, 5), 34: (5, 24, 5, 24), 29: (5, 23, 1, 5)}

If memory were a concern you could change the vk[v].append(k) line; right now it builds up an intermediate structure that's not needed, but I'm not entirely certain what the right selection logic in the case of collisions should be.

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What works for me is

C={v:k for k,v in {v:k for k, v in B.items()+A.items()}.iteritems()}

..which is compact code, and maybe only as expensive as O(n*log(n)), because all what's done is inserting in dictionaries.

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