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I have been doing some fitting in python using numpy (which uses least squares).

I was wondering if there was a way of getting it to fit data while forcing it through some fixed points? If not is there another library in python (or another language i can link to - eg c)?

NOTE I know it's possible to force through one fixed point by moving it to the origin and forcing the constant term to zero, as is noted here, but was wondering more generally for 2 or more fixed points :

http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=523360

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Not sure that interpolation will help here - if my polynomial model doesn't go through the right points no amount of interpolation will make it. –  JPH Mar 3 '13 at 21:38
2  
By fixed points you mean both x and y fixed, right? You can use en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrange_polynomial to interpolate while fixing those points. –  dranxo Mar 3 '13 at 21:47
1  
Thanks... that looks interesting. For the moment I've done a work around where I add the fixed points to the data, and weight them loads more than the rest.... Seems to work ok ish... –  JPH Mar 4 '13 at 0:38
1  
@rcompton Lagrange polynomials are great to fit a polynomial going exactly through certain points, but how exactly do you propose using them to approximately fit other points? –  Jaime Mar 4 '13 at 7:36
    
@Jaime I interpreted the question as "how do I fit data with the constraint that you pass through given points". They don't really do the same thing that your answer does. But I suppose if you're going to use Lagrange polynomials you might as well fit all the points exactly. –  dranxo Mar 4 '13 at 19:00

3 Answers 3

The mathematically correct way of doing a fit with fixed points is to use Lagrange multipliers. Basically, you modify the objective function you want to minimize, which is normally the sum of squares of the residuals, adding an extra parameter for every fixed point. I have not succeeded in feeding a modified objective function to one of scipy's minimizers. But for a polynomial fit, you can figure out the details with pen and paper and convert your problem into the solution of a linear system of equations:

def polyfit_with_fixed_points(n, x, y, xf, yf) :
    mat = np.empty((n + 1 + len(xf),) * 2)
    vec = np.empty((n + 1 + len(xf),))
    x_n = x**np.arange(2 * n + 1)[:, None]
    yx_n = np.sum(x_n[:n + 1] * y, axis=1)
    x_n = np.sum(x_n, axis=1)
    idx = np.arange(n + 1) + np.arange(n + 1)[:, None]
    mat[:n + 1, :n + 1] = np.take(x_n, idx)
    xf_n = xf**np.arange(n + 1)[:, None]
    mat[:n + 1, n + 1:] = xf_n / 2
    mat[n + 1:, :n + 1] = xf_n.T
    mat[n + 1:, n + 1:] = 0
    vec[:n + 1] = yx_n
    vec[n + 1:] = yf
    params = np.linalg.solve(mat, vec)
    return params[:n + 1]

To test that it works, try the following, where n is the number of points, d the degree of the polynomial and f the number of fixed points:

n, d, f = 50, 8, 3
x = np.random.rand(n)
xf = np.random.rand(f)
poly = np.polynomial.Polynomial(np.random.rand(d + 1))
y = poly(x) + np.random.rand(n) - 0.5
yf = np.random.uniform(np.min(y), np.max(y), size=(f,))
params = polyfit_with_fixed(d, x , y, xf, yf)
poly = np.polynomial.Polynomial(params)
xx = np.linspace(0, 1, 1000)
plt.plot(x, y, 'bo')
plt.plot(xf, yf, 'ro')
plt.plot(xx, poly(xx), '-')
plt.show()

enter image description here

And of course the fitted polynomial goes exactly through the points:

>>> yf
array([ 1.03101335,  2.94879161,  2.87288739])
>>> poly(xf)
array([ 1.03101335,  2.94879161,  2.87288739])
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If you use curve_fit(), you can use sigma argument to give every point a weight. The following example gives the first , middle, last point very small sigma, so the fitting result will be very close to these three points:

N = 20
x = np.linspace(0, 2, N)
np.random.seed(1)
noise = np.random.randn(N)*0.2
sigma =np.ones(N)
sigma[[0, N//2, -1]] = 0.01
pr = (-2, 3, 0, 1)
y = 1+3.0*x**2-2*x**3+0.3*x**4 + noise

def f(x, *p):
    return np.poly1d(p)(x)

p1, _ = optimize.curve_fit(f, x, y, (0, 0, 0, 0, 0), sigma=sigma)
p2, _ = optimize.curve_fit(f, x, y, (0, 0, 0, 0, 0))

x2 = np.linspace(0, 2, 100)
y2 = np.poly1d(p)(x2)
plot(x, y, "o")
plot(x2, f(x2, *p1), "r", label=u"fix three points")
plot(x2, f(x2, *p2), "b", label=u"no fix")
legend(loc="best")

enter image description here

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One simple and straightforward way is to utilize constrained least squares where constraints are weighted with a largish number M, like:

from numpy import dot
from numpy.linalg import solve
from numpy.polynomial.polynomial import Polynomial as P, polyvander as V

def clsq(A, b, C, d, M= 1e5):
    """A simple constrained least squared solution of Ax= b, s.t. Cx= d,
    based on the idea of weighting constraints with a largish number M."""
    return solve(dot(A.T, A)+ M* dot(C.T, C), dot(A.T, b)+ M* dot(C.T, d))

def cpf(x, y, x_c, y_c, n, M= 1e5):
    """Constrained polynomial fit based on clsq solution."""
    return P(clsq(V(x, n), y, V(x_c, n), y_c, M))

Obviously this is not really a all inclusive silver bullet solution, but apparently it seems to work reasonable well with an simple example (for M in [0, 4, 24, 124, 624, 3124]):

In []: x= linspace(-6, 6, 23)
In []: y= sin(x)+ 4e-1* rand(len(x))- 2e-1
In []: x_f, y_f= linspace(-(3./ 2)* pi, (3./ 2)* pi, 4), array([1, -1, 1, -1])
In []: n, x_s= 5, linspace(-6, 6, 123)    

In []: plot(x, y, 'bo', x_f, y_f, 'bs', x_s, sin(x_s), 'b--')
Out[]: <snip>

In []: for M in 5** (arange(6))- 1:
   ....:     plot(x_s, cpf(x, y, x_f, y_f, n, M)(x_s))
   ....: 
Out[]: <snip>

In []: ylim([-1.5, 1.5])
Out[]: <snip>
In []: show()

and producing output like: fits with progressive larger M

Edit: Added 'exact' solution:

from numpy import dot
from numpy.linalg import solve
from numpy.polynomial.polynomial import Polynomial as P, polyvander as V
from scipy.linalg import qr 

def solve_ns(A, b): return solve(dot(A.T, A), dot(A.T, b))

def clsq(A, b, C, d):
    """An 'exact' constrained least squared solution of Ax= b, s.t. Cx= d"""
    p= C.shape[0]
    Q, R= qr(C.T)
    xr, AQ= solve(R[:p].T, d), dot(A, Q)
    xaq= solve_ns(AQ[:, p:], b- dot(AQ[:, :p], xr))
    return dot(Q[:, :p], xr)+ dot(Q[:, p:], xaq)

def cpf(x, y, x_c, y_c, n):
    """Constrained polynomial fit based on clsq solution."""
    return P(clsq(V(x, n), y, V(x_c, n), y_c))

and testing the fit:

In []: x= linspace(-6, 6, 23)
In []: y= sin(x)+ 4e-1* rand(len(x))- 2e-1
In []: x_f, y_f= linspace(-(3./ 2)* pi, (3./ 2)* pi, 4), array([1, -1, 1, -1])
In []: n, x_s= 5, linspace(-6, 6, 123)
In []: p= cpf(x, y, x_f, y_f, n)
In []: p(x_f)
Out[]: array([ 1., -1.,  1., -1.])
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