Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm reading up on the Repository and UOW patterns and it seems like UOW takes a bunch of data, makes modifications to that data in memory, and then commits the changes at a certain point. I'd like to not implement another layer if I don't have to, so I'm trying to delegate some UOW responsibilities to my repository (namely, saving).

The repository of my current application performs saves immediately, like this:

public void DeleteBox(int BoxId)
        {
            var Box = GetBox(BoxId);
            if (Box != null)
            {
                foreach (var subBox in Box.Boxes.ToList())
                {
                    DeleteBox(subBox.BoxId);
                }

                if (Box.ParentBox != null)
                {
                    Box.ParentBox.Boxs.Remove(Box);
                    _db.SaveChanges();
                }
                _db.Boxs.Remove(Box);
                _db.SaveChanges();
            }
            else throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot delete Box because it doesn't exist");
        }

The code currently "works" but I'm wondering if performing SaveChanges here is less than ideal. As I begin to build out a WebAPI, should I consider calling saveChanges from the controller actions instead, and modify the state of the application within the repository? Any articles or references to help me better understand how saving should occur would be great - I'm a bit overwhelmed at the moment.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Personally, I like to create a full repository class that handles all CRUD operations for a domain model object, and that pass this repository into an MVC controller via an interface. The controller then exercises the various methods on the repository depending upon the application logic.

I feel that this approach has two main advantages:

  1. You get clean separation between your data access code in the repository and your application logic code in your controller. So your repository has complete responsibility for data access, and your controller maintains the application logic.
  2. This is an effective way to structure things for testing. By passing the repository into the controller via an interface, you can have complete testability of your controller via a mocking framework, such as RhinoMocks or Moq. Your data access code, which is difficult or impossible to test effectively, is concentrated into a single untestable class.

So for example, say I want to have a controller that does full CRUD operations on a Product class. I would create a repository interface and implementation as shown below. Note that the repository implementation requires an instance of your object-relational mapper (ORM) or data access layer. In this example, I pass in an instance of the nHibernate Session object via an ISession interface in the constructor.

public interface IProductRepo
{
    List<Product> GetProducts();
    Product GetProduct(int Id);
    void DeleteProduct(int Id);
    void CreateProduct(Product product);
    void UpdateProduct(Product product);
}

public class ProductRepo : IProductRepo
{
    public ProductRepo(ISession session)
    {
         _session = session;  
    }

    public Product GetProduct(int Id)
    {
         return _session<Product>().Get(Id);
    }

    //Implementation of other methods of IProductRepo

     ISession _session;
}

This repo can then be passed to the controller via constructor injection (my favorite) or property injection. So your controller would look something like this:

public class ProductController : ApiController
{
    public ProductController(IProductRepo repo)
    {
        _repo = repo;
    }
    public List<Product> GetProducts()
    {
        //other code as needed
        return _repo.GetProducts();
    }
    public Product GetProduct(int id)
    {
        //other code as needed
        return _repo.GetProduct(id);
    }
    public void PostProduct(Product product)
    {
        _repo.CreateProduct(product);
        //other code as needed
    }
    public void PutProduct(Product product)
    {
        _repo.UpdateProduct(product);
        //other code as needed
    }
    public void DeleteProduct(int id)
    {
        _repo.DeleteProduct(id);
        //other code as needed
    }
}

Microsoft has a good article that goes over a basic example of this for web API.

Edit: Repository Pattern

In the words of Martin Fowler

A Repository mediates between the domain and data mapping layers, acting like an in-memory domain object collection.

It is typically used in conjunction with an Object-relational-mapper (ORM) or data-access layer, like nHibernate or Entity Framework. So your repository would take an instance of of the ORM or data-access class that actually does the writing to and reading from your persistence layer. The repository is used to encapsulate all of your queries and CRUD operations on your ORM/data access classes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Joe. I noticed that out of the box API projects have calls to SaveChanges - do you just modify the state of your objects in Repository, or do you take care of saving the changes there? –  RobVious Mar 3 '13 at 23:17
    
Yes, the repository takes care of saving changes to the database In the typical usage, the repository takes an instance of your ORM or data access later class, and calls methods on this class to save changes or do other CRUD operations. I've updated the repo class in my answer to show a typical usage. Hope this is helpful. –  Joe Alfano Mar 3 '13 at 23:34
    
So the typical flow is that the controller calls the repository which calls the ORM or data access layer. –  Joe Alfano Mar 3 '13 at 23:53
    
Thank you again Joe - this all makes sense. –  RobVious Mar 4 '13 at 0:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.