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Edit: I updated the thread to answer some of the questions you have. This is an programming assignment. My solution doesn't work: To answer the comments on this thread, it is supposed to find the largest string alphabetically. For example 'Tom' is bigger than 'Andy'.

Write a recursive method to find the largest value in a singly linked list. Inherit from the class LinkedList and add the recursive method. You will need to use the iterator to access each node of the linkedlist. You may need to add a helper method to start the recursion. Use the driver class to populate your linked list and demonstrate that your method works. Add additional test to the driver class. The largest in the driver class provided is Tom.

Provided driver class:

public class MyLinkedListDriver {

public static void main(String[] args) {
    // TODO Auto-generated method stub

    MyLinkedList myLinkedList = new MyLinkedList();
    myLinkedList.add("Sarah");
    myLinkedList.add("Barbara");
    myLinkedList.add("Tom");
    myLinkedList.add("George");
    String largest = myLinkedList.findLargest();
    System.out.println(largest);
    System.out.println(myLinkedList.get(0));
}}

My solution(doesn't work): Well, I get nullpointer exception.

import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.LinkedList;


public class MyLinkedList extends LinkedList<String> {

Iterator<String> it = super.iterator();
String largest=it.next();

public String findLargest(){
    if (it.hasNext()==false){
        return largest;
    }
    else{
        String temp = it.next();
        int x=largest.compareTo(temp);
        if(x>0){
            largest=temp;
        }
        findLargest();
    }
    return largest;
}}

Can someone tell me what I did wrong? Thank you.

share|improve this question
1  
Where is largest defined? –  Dan W Mar 3 '13 at 22:06
    
Please try to make your question as specific as possible. "It doesn't work" isn't a question. –  jrajav Mar 3 '13 at 22:06
    
What do you mean by largest - having maximum length? –  Nishant Shreshth Mar 3 '13 at 22:07
4  
Inheriting from LinkedList is a very, very bad advice. –  JB Nizet Mar 3 '13 at 22:07
    
no it is supposed to find the largest alphabetically. –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 22:27

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is far from the best solution but this solution is by modifying the code you provided.

import java.util.Iterator;
import java.util.LinkedList;

public class MyLinkedList extends LinkedList {

Iterator<String> it = null;
String largest="";

public String findLargest(){
    if (it == null) {
        it = super.iterator();
    }   

    if (it.hasNext()==false){
        it = null;
        return largest;
    }
    else{
        String temp = it.next();
        int x=largest.compareTo(temp);
        if(x<0){
            largest=temp;
        }
        findLargest();
    }
    return largest;
}}
share|improve this answer
    
This works without any errors. But shows two names when I run it. "Tom" and "sarah". Could it be because there are two return statements? –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 22:51
    
It shows sarah because MyLinkedListDriver.java has the statement System.out.println(myLinkedList.get(0)); in it. Remove(comment out) that statement and you should not see "sarah". –  GJ13 Mar 3 '13 at 22:54
1  
@hbb: I still recommend that you check my proposed solution. It's much cleaner. You are using data members where you shouldn't... –  Eyal Schneider Mar 3 '13 at 22:58
    
@Gj13 oh, I see. I can't thank you enough. I have been trying to solve this for hours now. Stumbled upon this site when I couldn't figure it out. Thanks again. –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 23:00
    
@Eyal But wouldn't that require changing the driver class? edit: nevermind. I didnt see the other method. –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 23:02

The problem is with the way you initialize your class: MyLinkedList ..

You have :

String largest=it.next();

On construction, the list is empty, so it is empty. Therefore it.next() is null;

share|improve this answer
    
I think I know what you mean. But where else can I put it? I can't put it in the recursive method. –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 22:38
    
it.next() when there are no items doesn't return null. It throws NoSuchElementException. –  Eyal Schneider Mar 3 '13 at 22:41
    
pass the iterator as an argument to findLargets() from outside –  A4L Mar 3 '13 at 22:43
    
@Eyal SO what should i change? –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 22:46
    
@A4L U mean from the driver class? –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 22:46

Sorry, I don't see how your code can throw NullPointerException.

It should throw NoSuchElementException due to the fact that you try to get the first item of the iterator at construction time, when the collection is still empty. This is clearly a bug.

A hint on how to solve this: the iterator shouldn't be a data member. It doesn't describe a state of the object. Consider passing a new instance of an iterator to a helper method, which is the one to be recursive:

public String findLargest(){
    return findLargest(iterator());
}

private static String findLargest(Iterator<String> it) {
    // Think how you implement this part recursively WITHOUT using any data member
}
share|improve this answer
    
You are absolutely correct. Im so used to seeing Nullpointerexceptions, I must have misread it. Thanks. –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 22:53
    
Now I think about it, the code you provided makes sense. But I where should I declare the iterator. –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 23:05
    
@hbb: you should not declare it. Whenever you call findLargest(), a new iterator is created and passed to the helper method. You just need to replace my comment with the right code... –  Eyal Schneider Mar 3 '13 at 23:12
    
edit: posting code as a comment was a bad idea. –  hbb Mar 3 '13 at 23:21
    
@hbb: you are still using data members. You don't need "largest" as a data member belonging to an instance. Think about the iterator as a concatenation of a first item and a tail. The maximum is either the first item, or the maximum of the tail. –  Eyal Schneider Mar 3 '13 at 23:24

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