Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am writing a program that uses Euclids algorithm of GCD(a, b) = GCD(b, r) r = a%b. I wrote a method that should return an integer for the main method to spit out, yet when I call for it to do this it says that it is not returning an integer. Here is the code

public class Euclid {

    public static int GCD(int a, int b)
    {
        while (b != 0)
        {
            int r = a%b;
            System.out.println("(" +a+ "," +b+ ")");
            b = r;
            a = b;
            if(b == 0)
            {
                return a;
            }
        }
    }
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        System.out.println(GCD(36, 20));    
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
This code is wrong. b=r;a=b results in a=r as well. You probably meant a=b;b=r. –  Apprentice Queue Mar 3 '13 at 22:26
    
Thank you I just realized that after I posted it –  user1940007 Mar 3 '13 at 22:32
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

In the code if b == 0 it will not return an int or any value for that matter. You must handle this condition, most likely by specifying a default return value.

  public static int GCD(int a, int b)
    {
        while (b != 0)
        {
            int r = a%b;
            System.out.println("(" +a+ "," +b+ ")");
            b = r;
            a = b;
            if(b == 0)
            {
                return a;
            }
        }
        return 0;
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

The compiler can't tell that your method will eventually reach the b == 0 condition and return. You can refactor it to:

    int ret = 1;
    while (b != 0)
    {
        int r = a%b;
        System.out.println("(" +a+ "," +b+ ")");
        b = r;
        a = b;
        if(b == 0)
        {
            ret = a;
            break;
        }
    }
    return ret;
share|improve this answer
    
True. I didn't really read the algorithm. Just thought: 0 is a strange value for a GCD. –  JB Nizet Mar 3 '13 at 22:29
    
@JBNizet gcd(0,0) is 0. Luchian, you should initialize ret = a;, or you'll get wrong results for gcd(a,0) with a > 1. –  Daniel Fischer Mar 3 '13 at 22:37
    
I'm not a math expert, but I've always been told that dividing by 0 didn't make any sense, whatever the numerator is. Computing the GCD of 0 and 0 doesn't make any sense, and should throw an IllegalArgumentException. I agree that ret should be a, though. –  JB Nizet Mar 3 '13 at 22:42
    
@JBNizet Just came across this again. See the proposal to remove the gcd 0 0 error in Haskell for a short (very short) outline. –  Daniel Fischer Apr 19 '13 at 21:17
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.