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I'm hesitating how to organize implementing SHA2 algorithm in C++.

My hesitation comes from the fact that SHA2 can be implemented in 4 ways that will produce 4 different digest sizes (224, 256, 384 and 512 bits).

I was thinking of a template class specialized for digest sizes that can be produced with SHA2. The question is then what to write for the non-specialized class. I can think of some possibilities :

//1 : throw exception on instantiation.
template<size_t bits> class SHA2 : public HashAlgorithm<Bits,Bits>{

public:
    SHA2(){
        throw SHA2NotImplementedException(bits);
    }
    virtual ~SHA2() throw(){}
    virtual Bits hash(const Bits& data)const = 0;
}

//2 : throw exception on use.
template<size_t bits> class SHA2 : public HashAlgorithm<Bits,Bits>{

public:
    virtual ~SHA2() throw(){}
    virtual Bits hash(const Bits& data)const{return SHA2NotImplementedException(bits);}
}

//3 : forbid instantiation and inheritance.
template<size_t bits> class SHA2 : public HashAlgorithm<Bits,Bits>{

private:
    SHA2(){}

public:
    virtual ~SHA2() throw(){}
    virtual Bits hash(const Bits& data)const = 0;
}

//4 : forbid instantiation.
template<size_t bits> class SHA2 : public HashAlgorithm<Bits,Bits>{

public:
    virtual ~SHA2() throw(){}
    virtual Bits hash(const Bits& data)const = 0;
}


//5 : dummy return.
template<size_t bits> class SHA2 : public HashAlgorithm<Bits,Bits>{

public:
    virtual ~SHA2() throw(){}
    virtual Bits hash(const Bits& data)const{return Bits();}
}


//Write template specialization for bits = 224, 256, 384 and 512

So, what would you write? Which option would be clearer than others and why?

PS : I could also just write 4 separate algorithms without ma****ting to code style.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you use a template argument, that value must be available at compile time. It seems silly to wait until runtime to flag the error if there is no possible implementation.

So leave the unspecialised template unspecified and let it produce a compile-time error.

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Just leave it completely empty (no member functions or variables declared)...why not? That's the standard technique if the unspecialized class won't be used.

Templates instantiations do not have to have the same interfaces: they're basically completely separate classes

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