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I'm getting a strange error that I can't for the life of me crack.

I'm coding a card game and I have two tables of different lengths. One links entries to functions, and the other holds the played cards. The first table is for attributes that certain cards in the deck have.

ATTRIBUTES = {  
        Reset   = RuleBook.Do_Reset,
        Go_Lower= RuleBook.Do_Go_Lower,
        Mirror  = RuleBook.Do_Mirror}

The way these functions are called is as follows:

ATTRIBUTES[cardPile[#cardPile].Attribute]()

I've printed out of contents of both the card object and the ATTRIBUTES table and both are completely in tact. Cards that have an attribute have a table entry under Attribute for a function, and those link up to the Do_... functions. Yet the above line of code doesn't appear to work. If anyone has ideas or suggestions they'd be appreciated.

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Doesn't work how? What errors are generated? How do your functions are normally called? Give an example from the cardPile table. –  hjpotter92 Mar 3 '13 at 23:21
    
Attempt to call field '?' (a nil value) is the error message I'm recieving. As for how I'm calling my functions; normally as far as I'm aware. This is the only point in the code where functions are called in the manner. One entry from cardPile would be this: number 1, Attribute function, picture 2D.png, isSelected = false. That's what I get from printing out the table –  user2087398 Mar 3 '13 at 23:35
    
I tried to reciprocate your example, and it seems to be working fine. Please provide more code with how you're storing data to cardPile table. codepad.org/gR0yXQTt –  hjpotter92 Mar 3 '13 at 23:55
    
I store to cardPile in a regular for the loop. codepad.org/VdPRkhcx Where cardsToBePlayed is another table that, as you can probably guess, holds card objects that are to be played. The object(s) in this table have a series of validity tests run against then to make sure they are indeed playable. –  user2087398 Mar 4 '13 at 0:31
1  
Not the whole code though. Just something we can run but that showcases the same problem would be best. –  hugomg Mar 4 '13 at 14:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Lua lets you basically use any kind of lua value as a key in a table. The problem with your code above is that your ATTRIBUTE table uses strings as the key but cardPile[#cardPile].Attribute is a function NOT a string.

When you perform the lookup here:

ATTRIBUTES[cardPile[#cardPile].Attribute]()

You're saying lookup the corresponding value in ATTRIBUTES having the key cardPile[#cardPile].Attribute which is a function. Your ATTRIBUTES table as you have it defined only contain strings as keys -- it has no functions as keys so nil is returned.

Two possible fixes for this:

Assuming cardPile's Attribute field already refers to the function you want, you can just call it like this:

cardPile[#cardPile].Attribute()

The alternative is to change how you setup card_obj's Attribute field -- make it refer to a string instead of the the function:

function Card.Create(Suit, Number, Name)
  local card_obj = {}
  -- ...
  if( card_obj.number == 1 ) then
    card_obj.Attribute = "Reset"
  elseif( card_obj.number == 6 ) then
    card_obj.Attribute = "Go_Lower"
  -- ... etc.
  else
    card_obj.Attribute = nil;
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very, very much for this answer. I will test it as soon as I can (unfortunately in the mean time a tricky syntax error has popped up that I need to fix). Just to clarify one thing though; when you say "cardPile[#cardPile].Attribute()" I'm assuming you mean this as being in place of the "ATTRIBUTES[cardPile[#cardPile].Attribute]()" line of code? –  user2087398 Mar 6 '13 at 1:56
    
yes that is correct. remember you can accept the answer if it solves your question. –  greatwolf Mar 6 '13 at 4:27

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