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I'm trying to make a program in Python that checks to see if a text file has duplicate words in it. (And in turn, returns a Boolean if there is or isn't)

For example, I have a text file named, "copy". In that text file is a one line sentence. "there there is no copies" (two there's in the sentence)

In another file, "nocopy", it would be one line, "there is no copies". (only one there)

So far I have the build of my Python Program:

def duplicate(fname):
 '(file.txt) ==> (Boolean) Returns True if there are duplicate words'
 infile = open(fname, 'r')
 l = infile.read()
 infile.close
 #Missing code here

I can't figure out what to do next. My idea would be a nested for loop, but I don't think I need it. Help would be very much appreciated. Thanks!

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1  
I may become the next pope in Vatican if this kind of question hasn't been asked dozens of times. –  eyquem Mar 4 '13 at 1:00
    
Hint: collections.Counter –  Brian Neal Mar 4 '13 at 1:06

4 Answers 4

If you want to see if there are any duplicate words anywhere in the file, then I'd do this:

def duplicates(fname):
    with open(fname) as f:
        words = f.read().split()
    return len(set(words)) != len(words)

This would check if the number of the set of all the words (that is, every unique word) is equal to how many words there are.

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I think you want this:

def duplicate(fname):
    infile = open(fname, 'r')
    for line in infile.readlines():
        for a in line.split(' '):
                line=line.replace(a,"",1)
                if a in line:
                        return True

if you want to try it:

def duplicate(fname):
    infile = open(fname, 'r')
    for line in infile.readlines():
                for a in line.split(' '):
                        line=line.replace(a,"",1)
                        if a in line:
                                return True






if(duplicate('fname.txt')):
        print "yes"

if duplicate returns true it will print yes.

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1  
A file is an iterator over lines by itself: for line in infile: ... No need to use .readlines() here. –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 4 '13 at 2:13

I assume that you are looking for repeated words which are next to each other. For example, you wouldn't want to eliminate the 'there' in 'There is a pretty house over there.' The pretty straight forward option would be splitting the lines into lists and then compare consecutive elements, removing the duplicate. Then, it would be a matter of iterating over the list and print each value with spaces accordingly. If you are just interested in the size, you can always convert a list of words into a set of words and then check if their sizes are still the same.

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def duplicate(fname):
    '(file.txt) ==> (Boolean) Returns True if there are duplicate words'
    infile = open(fname, 'r')
    fLines = []
    for line in infile:
        l = line.split(' ')
        fLines += [i.lower().rstrip('\n') for i in l]
    infile.close()
    nLines = list(set(fLines))
    for l in nLines:
        if fLines.count(l) > 1: return True
    return False

I suggest using a set because it removes duplicates, so it limits the amount of iterations required. Note that this does not account for punctuation (just use s.strip(punctuation) to get rid of that). However, duplicates are defined as the same word, not case-sensitive.

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