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I do know a bit of polymorphism but I'm a bit lost in here, on the implicit conversion from B to A the method from B is called but with explicit the method from A is called, which makes sense, but it only works this way in case the methods are virtual, otherwise in both cases ShowA is input (the method from class A is called).

class A
{
public:
    A(){};
    ~A(){}
public:
    int n;
      virtual void Show(){ cout << "ShowA" << endl;  };
};

class B : public A
{
public:
    B(){};
    ~B(){}
     virtual void Show() { cout << "ShowB" << endl; }
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    B b;
    A& a = b; //ShowB
    A& a = (A)b; //ShowA
    a.Show();

    //Extra:
    A& extra = extra;

    return 0;
}

In addition is there a reason why A& extra = extra isn't forbidden, or simply because there is little importance to forbidden senseless things?

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So... what's the question? –  Yaniv Mar 4 '13 at 1:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
A& a = (A)b;

This creates a temporary object of type A, copying the base-class part of b. It then tries to take a reference to this temporary.

Luckily, the C++ language doesn't allow you to take a (non-constant) reference to a temporary, preventing you from making this kind of mistake by accident.

Unluckily, your compiler provides a "language extension" that does allow you to do that, so if you must use that compiler then you'll need to be more careful.

In general, avoid C-style casts like the plague. When you really do need an explicit conversion, use the most restrictive C++-style cast you can, to help the compiler catch errors.

In addition is there a reason why A& extra = extra isn't forbidden, or simply because there is little importance to forbidden senseless things?

There's no good reason for that to be allowed; presumably, it's not forbidden because it would be rather complicated to forbid that without forbidding legitimate declarations like int i, &r=i; or void *p = &p;

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Excellent answer, thanks Mike! –  Viniyo Shouta Mar 4 '13 at 17:49

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