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I've been trying to add bitwise operators to a prefix/infix/postfix calculator I was given but for some reason I can't get the operators "<<" ">>" "**" to be recognized using yacc. I've looked around for some other people with similar issues, particularly this question yacc/bison tokens error. '>>>' and '>>' both assigned number 62, but haven't found a working solution.

My lex file

%{
#include "zcalc.h"
#include <math.h>

int ch;
int flag = 0;

#define NAME 257            
#define SEMISYM 268 
#define COMMASYM 269 
#define LPARSYM 270
#define RPARSYM 271
#define EQSYM 272 
#define PLUSSYM 273
#define MULTSYM 274
#define ASGNSYM 275 
#define MINUSSYM 276 
#define NUMBER 277
#define TILDE 278

/*New stuff I added*/
#define BITAND 279
#define BITOR 280
#define BITXOR 281
/*#define BITNOT 282*/
#define LSHIFT 283
#define RSHIFT 284
#define POWER 285

void yyerror( char *mesg ); /* yacc error checker */



/* definitions for lex analyzer */
letter [A-Za-z]         
digit  [0-9]+       
ident {letter}({letter}|{digit})*           
ws  [ \t\n]+                
other  .


%%

{ws}  ;         /*---- Tokens and Actions---- */
/*New Stuff*/
"&" return BITAND;
"|" return BITOR;
"^" return BITXOR;
"<<" return LSHIFT;
">>" return RSHIFT;
"**" return POWER;

"//".* ;                
";" return SEMISYM;         
"," return COMMASYM;            
"(" return LPARSYM; 



")" return RPARSYM;         
"==" return EQSYM;          
"+" return PLUSSYM;         
"*" return MULTSYM;         
"=" return ASGNSYM;         
"-" return MINUSSYM;
"~" return TILDE;

/*New Stuff
"&" return BITAND;
"|" return BITOR;
"^" return BITXOR;
"<<" return LSHIFT;
">>" return RSHIFT;
"**" return POWER;*/


{ident}     {
                 return NAME;
            }

{digit}     {
                 return NUMBER;
            }

"$"   { return 0; }

{other} ;               /* ignore other stuff */

%%

void yyerror( char *mesg ); /* yacc error checker */

/* yacc error function */
void yyerror( char *mesg ) {
  flag = 1;
  printf("%s \n" , mesg);  
}

int main() {
  printf("Lex  \t\tToken\t\t\n"); /* header on columns */
  printf("----------------------------\n"); 
  do
  {
    ch = yylex();

    if (ch == SEMISYM)
      printf("%s\t\tSEMICOLON ", yytext);
    else if (ch == COMMASYM)
      printf("%s\t\tCOMMA ", yytext);
    else if (ch == LPARSYM)
      printf("%s\t\tL_PARENTHESIS ", yytext);
    else if (ch == RPARSYM)
      printf("%s\t\tR_PARENTHESIS ", yytext);
    else if (ch == EQSYM)
      printf("%s\t\tEQ_OP ", yytext);
    else if (ch == PLUSSYM)
      printf("%s\t\tPLUS_OP ", yytext);
    else if (ch == MULTSYM)
      printf("%s\t\tMULT_OP ", yytext);
    else if (ch == ASGNSYM)
      printf("%s\t\tASSIGNMENT_STMT ", yytext);
    else if (ch == MINUSSYM)
      printf("%s\t\tMINUS_OP ", yytext);
    else if (ch == NUMBER)
      printf("%s\t\tNUMBER ", yytext);
    else if (ch == NAME)
      printf("%s\t\tNAME\t\t", yytext);
     else if (ch == TILDE)
        printf("%s\t\tTILDE\t\t", yytext);
        else
         printf("%c ",ch);
         printf("\n");          /* end check token read */
       }
       while(ch != 0);          /* read until end of file */    

      return 0;
    }

    int yywrap() {
      return 1;
    }

    %}

And my yacc file

    %{ 
#include "zcalc.h"

#include <string.h>
#include <math.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>




int flag = 0;

void yyerror( char *mesg ); /* yacc error checker */

%}

%union {
  double dval;
  struct symtab *symp;
}

%token <symp> NAME
%token <dval> NUMBER
 // %token LSHIFT
 // %token RSHIFT
%token POWER

%left '-' '+'
 //%left "**"
%left '*' '/'
 //%left LSHIFT RSHIFT
 //%left POWER

%type <dval> expression
%%

statement_list: statement '\n'
                | statement_list statement '\n'

statement: NAME '=' expression { $1->value = $3; }
           | expression { printf("= %g\n", $1); }

expression: '+' expression expression { $$ = $2 + $3; }
            | '-' expression expression { $$ = $2 - $3; }
            | POWER expression expression { $$ = $3; }
            | '*' expression expression { $$ = $2 * $3; }
            | '/' expression expression { $$ = $2 / $3; }
            | '&' expression expression { $$ = (int)$2 & (int)$3; }
            | '|' expression expression { $$ = (int)$2 | (int)$3; }
            | '^' expression expression { $$ = (int)$2 ^ (int)$3; }
            | '<' '<' expression expression { $$ = (int)$3 << (int)$4; }
            | '>' '>' expression expression { $$ = (int)$3 >> (int)$4; }
//| "**" expression expression { $$ = pow($2, $3); }
            | '~' expression { $$ = ~ (int)$2; }
            | '(' expression ')' { $$ = $2; }
            | NUMBER
            | NAME { $$ = $1->value; }
%%

struct symtab * symlook( char *s ) {
   char *p;
   struct symtab *sp;

   for(sp = symtab; sp < &symtab[NSYMS]; sp++) {
     /* is it already here? */
     if (sp->name && !strcmp(sp->name, s))
       return sp;

     /* is it free */
     if (!sp->name) {
       sp->name = strdup(s);
       return sp;
     }
     /* otherwise continue to the next */
   }
   yyerror("Too many symbols...\n");
   exit(1);
}

void addfunc( char *name, double (*func)() ) {
  struct symtab *sp = symlook(name);
  sp->funcptr = func;
}


/* yacc error function */
void yyerror( char *mesg )  {
  flag = 1;
  printf("%s \n" , mesg);  
}


int main() {

  yyparse();

  return 0;
}

I've fiddled around with the placement of defines and rules in the headers but that didn't seem to work. I can get the "<<" and ">>" to work using '<' '<' but it throws the argument count off and seems like more of a workaround than a proper solution. Thanks for the help!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is that while you can define and use tokens like "<<" and ">>" in bison, such tokens don't have macros that expand to their values defined in the .tab.h file, so there's no (easy) way to generate the tokens in your lexer. In order to use them, you need to figure out what token value (an integer) bison assigned to them (you can see it in the .output file) and return that integer. But any changes to the .y file (any new tokens added, or even just things reordered) might change that, so its pretty much impossible to maintain.

Instead, it makes more sense to define name tokens (like LSHIFT and RSHIFT) for which bison will generate macros that expand to the token number, allowing you to easily refer to them in the lexer.

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I thought I had tried something like that previously. Isn't that what the #define POWER 285 and | POWER expression expression { $$ = $3; } are supposed to do? –  kwelliott Mar 4 '13 at 14:30
    
@kwelliott: 285 is probably the wrong value for POWER -- you want to let bison generate the #define for you in the .tab.h file it generates. Delete all the #defines in the lex file and instead add #include "postfix.tab.h" (or whatever your .y file is called) and run bison with the -d flag to produce the .tab.h file. –  Chris Dodd Mar 4 '13 at 17:06

Your Flex source isn't correct; the %} at the end should be way up the file, but that's so egregious it must be a problem with copying the material to SO (you get 'premature EOF' with the %} where it's shown in the question).

The test harness wasn't upgraded to print the new entries. When I change the else clause to:

    else
        printf("%d\t\tUNKNOWN (%s)",ch, yytext);

and then run the test program on this pot pourri of symbols, it seems to behave:

Lex         Token       
----------------------------
()+*=-~ &|^>>**<<;,()===
(       L_PARENTHESIS
)       R_PARENTHESIS
+       PLUS_OP
*       MULT_OP
=       ASSIGNMENT_STMT
-       MINUS_OP
~       TILDE
279     UNKNOWN (&)
280     UNKNOWN (|)
281     UNKNOWN (^)
284     UNKNOWN (>>)
260     UNKNOWN (**)
283     UNKNOWN (<<)
;       SEMICOLON
,       COMMA
(       L_PARENTHESIS
)       R_PARENTHESIS
==      EQ_OP
=       ASSIGNMENT_STMT
0       UNKNOWN ()

Before that, it would print apparently blank lines, though actually there were control characters on them as 279-283 are reduced modulo 256 to character codes 23-27 or control-W to control-[.

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I would suggest using

%token LSHIFT "<<"
...
%left "<<"
...
expression: expression "<<" expression {...}

in the Bison file, and in the Flex file:

"<<"  return LSHIFT;

Pay attention to use "<<" in the grammar file, not '<<' as you wrote it.

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