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I am trying to do some text processing and need to recode the words of sentences so that a target word is identified in a particular way in the new variable. For instance, given a data frame that looks like this...

subj <- c("1", "1", "1", "2", "2", "2", "2", "2")
condition <- c("A", "A", "A", "B", "B", "B", "B", "B")
sentence <- c("1", "1", "1", "2", "2", "2", "2", "2")
word <- c("I", "like", "dogs.", "We", "don't", "like", "this", "song.")
d <- data.frame(subj,condition, sentence, word)

 subj condition sentence  word
 1         A        1     I
 1         A        1     like
 1         A        1     dogs.
 2         B        2     We
 2         B        2     don't
 2         B        2     like
 2         B        2     this
 2         B        2     song.

I need to create a new column for which every instance of the target word (in this example, when d$word="like") is marked 0, and all words before "like" in the sentence block decrement and all words after "like" increment. Each subject has multiple sentences, and sentences vary by condition, so the loop needs to consider instances of the target word per subject, per sentence. The end result should look something like this.

 subj condition sentence  word   position
 1         A        1     I        -1
 1         A        1     like      0
 1         A        1     dogs.     1
 2         B        2     We       -2
 2         B        2     don't    -1
 2         B        2     like      0
 2         B        2     this      1
 2         B        2     song.     2

Sorry if the question is poorly worded, I hope it makes sense! Note that the target is not in the same place (relative to the start of the sentence) in each sentence. I am pretty new to R and can figure out how to increment or decrement, but not do both things within each sentence block. Any suggestions on the best way to go about this? Thanks much!

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How do you decide if (for example) We is -2 from the second like or +2 from the first like? –  thelatemail Mar 4 '13 at 2:10
    
@thelatemail, there is a column called sentence ;) –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 4 '13 at 2:20
    
@RicardoSaporta - great, but what if the sentence is I like the way you like to like things. –  thelatemail Mar 4 '13 at 2:30
1  
@thelatemail, then presumably, the sentence would need to be split in to parts. However, I would guess that such preprocessing would be handled prior to determining relative positions. Also, I like the way you like to like things too. –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 4 '13 at 2:41
    
@thelatemail this was actually from an experimental manipulation so we had taken that into consideration, but yes, it wouldn't be a good way to code a corpus! –  amurphy Mar 4 '13 at 3:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I would think in text processing that it would be wise to avoid letting your text entries become factors. In this case I used as.character but I would recommend setting options(stringsAsFactors=FALSE);

d$position <- with( d, ave(as.character(word), sentence, 
                               FUN=function(x) seq_along(x) - which(x=="like") ) )
> d
  subj condition sentence  word position
1    1         A        1     I       -1
2    1         A        1  like        0
3    1         A        1 dogs.        1
4    2         B        2    We       -2
5    2         B        2 don't       -1
6    2         B        2  like        0
7    2         B        2  this        1
8    2         B        2 song.        2
share|improve this answer
    
Amazingly efficient, thank you! –  amurphy Mar 4 '13 at 3:41
    
+1!! Very slick, and extremely fast –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 4 '13 at 3:57

You can add an index which you can then use for the relative positions.
Using data.table makes breaking it down by sentence very easy

library(data.table)
DT <- data.table(indx=1:nrow(d), d, key="indx")

DT[, position:=(indx - indx[word=="like"]), by=sentence]

# Results
DT
#    indx subj condition sentence  word position
# 1:    1    1         A        1     I       -1
# 2:    2    1         A        1  like        0
# 3:    3    1         A        1 dogs.        1
# 4:    4    2         B        2    We       -2
# 5:    5    2         B        2 don't       -1
# 6:    6    2         B        2  like        0
# 7:    7    2         B        2  this        1
# 8:    8    2         B        2 song.        2

Udate:

In case you have grammatically incorrect sentences, you might want to use grepl instead of ==

DT[, position:=(indx - indx[grepl("like", word)]), by=sentence]
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This is great - I've really got to learn data.table –  alexwhan Mar 4 '13 at 2:12
1  
@alexwhan, I got turned onto it here on SO and it's absolutely incredible –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 4 '13 at 2:13
    
Thank you, this looks great except I keep getting the following error: Error in [.data.frame(DT, , :=(position, (indx - indx[grepl("like", : unused argument(s) (by = sentence) Not sure what the problem could be as I copied your code exactly... –  amurphy Mar 4 '13 at 3:24
    
did you install the data.table package and then call it using library(data.table)? –  Ricardo Saporta Mar 4 '13 at 3:49
    
I did do that, yes! Might it have something to do with the data type of d$position? If I set this to factor or character I get a different error, Combining := in j with by is not yet implemented. Please let maintainer('data.table') know if you are interested in this. –  amurphy Mar 4 '13 at 21:38

Customary solution with plyr

 ddply(d, .(subj, condition, sentence), transform, 
   position = seq_along(word) - which(word == 'like'))
share|improve this answer
    
This works well, thank you! –  amurphy Mar 4 '13 at 21:44

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