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I am in the process of creating a package that uses a data.table as a dataset and has a couple of functions which assign by reference using :=.

I have built a simple package to demonstrate my problem

 library(devtools)
 install_github('foo','mnel')

It contains two functions

foo <- function(x){
  x[, a := 1]
}
fooCall <- function(x){
  eval(substitute(x[, a :=1]),parent.frame(1))
} 

and a dataset (not lazy loaded) DT, created using

DT <- data.table(b = 1:5)
save(DT, file = 'data/DT.rda')

When I install this package, my understanding is that foo(DT) should assign by reference within DT.

 library(foo)
 data(DT)
 foo(DT)
   b a
1: 1 1
2: 2 1
3: 3 1
4: 4 1
5: 5 1

# However this has not assigned by reference within `DT`

DT
   b
1: 1
2: 2
3: 3
4: 4
5: 5

If I use the more correct

tracmem(DT)
DT <- foo(DT)
# This works without copying
DT 
 b a
1: 1 1
2: 2 1
3: 3 1
4: 4 1
5: 5 1
untracemem(DT)

If I use eval and substitute within the function

fooCall(DT)
   b a
1: 1 1
2: 2 1
3: 3 1
4: 4 1
5: 5 1
# it does assign by reference 
DT
   b a
1: 1 1
2: 2 1
3: 3 1
4: 4 1
5: 5 1

Should I stick with

  1. DT <- foo(DT) or the eval/substitute route, or
  2. Is there something I'm not understanding about how data loads datasets, even when not lazy?
share|improve this question
    
Never tried to update by reference data in packages! But isn't data in packages supposed to be read only given they're sealed? Typing DT at the end here doesn't mean it's been assigned by reference does it? DT could have been copied to .GlobalEnv and that could be where it has been updated. –  Matt Dowle Mar 4 '13 at 7:58
    
Btw tracemem reports duplications by R itself. It is unlikely to catch a copy that data.table does, for example when over-allocating for the first time because technically that's not a perfect duplication, but an over-allocation (albeit a shallow copy not a deep one). –  Matt Dowle Mar 4 '13 at 8:01
    
Maybe try alloc.col on the data object in the package, and see what happens. –  Matt Dowle Mar 4 '13 at 8:04
    
@MatthewDowle I thought data(DT) created a copy in the global environment, lazy loading might imply a locked dataset. I am not trying to update the copy in the package, but use the dataset in an example / vignette. –  mnel Mar 4 '13 at 8:10
    
I'm not familiar with data() but yes that doesn't sound wrong. But R is creating it (not data.table) i.e. that's R's data() command which doesn't know about over-allocation. Similar to when you load() a data.table it won't be over-allocated until the first := adds a new column. Does library(foo); data(DT); alloc.col(DT); foo(DT) work? Then we can go from there. –  Matt Dowle Mar 4 '13 at 8:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This has nothing to do with datasets or locking -- you can reproduce it simply using

DT<-unserialize(serialize(data.table(b = 1:5),NULL))
foo(DT)
DT

I suspect it has to do with the fact that data.table has to re-create the extptr inside the object on the first access on DT, but it's doing so on a copy so there is no way it can share the modification with the original in the global environment.


[From Matthew] Exactly.

DT<-unserialize(serialize(data.table(b = 1:3),NULL))
DT
   b
1: 1
2: 2
3: 3
DT[,newcol:=42]
DT                 # Ok. DT rebound to new shallow copy (when direct)
   b newcol
1: 1     42
2: 2     42
3: 3     42

DT<-unserialize(serialize(data.table(b = 1:3),NULL))
foo(DT)
   b a
1: 1 1
2: 2 1
3: 3 1
DT                 # but not ok when via function foo()
   b
1: 1
2: 2
3: 3


DT<-unserialize(serialize(data.table(b = 1:3),NULL))
alloc.col(DT)      # alloc.col needed first
   b
1: 1
2: 2
3: 3
foo(DT)
   b a
1: 1 1
2: 2 1
3: 3 1
DT                 # now it's ok
   b a
1: 1 1
2: 2 1
3: 3 1

Or, don't pass DT into the function, just refer to it directly. Use data.table like a database: a few fixed name tables in .GlobalEnv.

DT <- unserialize(serialize(data.table(b = 1:5),NULL))
foo <- function() {
   DT[, newcol := 7]
}
foo()
   b newcol
1: 1      7
2: 2      7
3: 3      7
4: 4      7
5: 5      7
DT              # Unserialized data.table now over-allocated and updated ok.
   b newcol
1: 1      7
2: 2      7
3: 3      7
4: 4      7
5: 5      7
share|improve this answer
1  
@Matthew: but note that alloc.col() will equally not work inside functions (for the same reasons above) - you really need something that does not try to fake out references - e.g. what works is DT <- DT[TRUE]. This is something worth mentioning in data.table docs, because unserializing data.table objects creates an issue that is hard to trace (and it happens all the time - in workspaces, packages etc.). –  Simon Urbanek Mar 4 '13 at 20:10
    
Only an issue, I believe, if a column is needed to be added by reference to an unserialized data.table, from within a function, and that table name isn't known in advance (i.e. needs to be passed in via the function argument). I can't think of an example where calling alloc.col(DT) straight after the unserialize wouldn't be possible, but needed in practice as well. I tend to use data.table like a database; i.e. a few large fixed name tables in .GlobalEnv. Please see new edit. –  Matt Dowle Mar 4 '13 at 21:23
    
@MatthewDowle (and Simon) -- thanks for the pointers, I can see that your second example is somewhat similar to my idea of constructing the appropriate call, and evaluating it in the correct parent environment. (fooCall in my question) –  mnel Mar 5 '13 at 0:38

Another solution is to use inst/extdata to save the rda file (which would contain any number of data.table objects) and have a file DT.r within the data subdirectory

# get the environment from the call to `data()`
env <- get('envir', parent.frame(1))
# load the data
load(system.file('extdata','DT.rda', package= 'foo'), envir = env)
# overallocate (evaluating in correct environment)
if(require(data.table)){
# the contents of `DT.rda` are known, so write out in full
  evalq(alloc.col(DT), envir = env)

}
# clean up so `env` object not present in env environment after calling `data(DT)`
rm(list = c('env'), envir = env)



}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Interesting. I wonder if alloc.col should be enhanced to accept a character vector as well? Then it could wrap the load() call. I don't think you need the data.table:: prefix as alloc.col is exported and intended for user use. –  Matt Dowle Mar 5 '13 at 13:39
    
@MatthewDowle, good point re data.table:: fixed, and revised to specific case where results of load are known in advance. alloc.col might require an environment argument as well. –  mnel Mar 5 '13 at 23:21
    
Good idea. FR#2595 to enhance alloc.col now filed. –  Matt Dowle Mar 6 '13 at 10:36

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