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I haven't been able to find out anything on this.
I would like to know how to use a function (e.g. clear_screen) that can print out 20 blank lines.
The last line of my program should be a call to clear_screen.

The start of my code is:

def new_line():
    print
def three_lines():
    new_line()
    new_line()
    new_line()
def nine_lines():
    three_lines()
    three_lines()
    three_lines()
print " "
nine_lines()
print " "

The print function works, but not with clear_screen() and that's what I need working.
If anyone can help me or have any suggestions, that would be great, thanks.

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marked as duplicate by jogojapan, Bakuriu, Lukas Knuth, Aviram Segal, Godeke Mar 4 '13 at 16:54

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
use curses -- part of the Python library –  dawg Mar 4 '13 at 6:33
    
check stackoverflow.com/questions/4810537/… –  avasal Mar 4 '13 at 6:33
    
@drewk: Not available on Windows. –  Tim Pietzcker Mar 4 '13 at 6:33
    
@TimPietzcker: Console then –  dawg Mar 4 '13 at 6:35
    
@TimPietzcker: OK then -- the solution is boycott MS until Windows is POSIX >:-) –  dawg Mar 4 '13 at 6:43
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2 Answers 2

Your clear_screen can be

  1. os.system Based

    def clear_screen():
        import os
        os.system( [ 'clear', 'cls' ][ os.name == 'nt' ] )
    

    Works on unix and Windows.
    Source: Here

  2. Newline-based

    def clear_screen():
        print '\n'*19 # print creates it's own newline
    

As per your comment, it seems your code is

def new_line():
    print
def three_lines():
    new_line()
    new_line()
    new_line()
def nine_lines():
    three_lines()
    three_lines()
    three_lines()
print " "
nine_lines()
print " "

It will work and does,
But Why do you want to have such a long piece of code if print '\n'*8 can do the same?

Speed Test
Even though you don't have a speed restriction, here's some speed stats for 100 runs each

os.system function took 2.49699997902 seconds.
'\n' function took 0.0160000324249 seconds.
Your function took 0.0929999351501 seconds.
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You do realize your second 'here' points to the other answer on the same question right? ;) :D –  DarkCthulhu Mar 4 '13 at 6:45
    
@Cthulhu Yes, actually I was going to post that, but you posted it just before me, so I figured I'll link it to your's. –  Schoolboy Mar 4 '13 at 6:48
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There isn't a single cross-platform way I think. So instead of relying on os.*, the following could work

print("\n"*20)
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! The start of my code is def new_line(): print def three_lines(): new_line() new_line() new_line() def nine_lines(): three_lines() three_lines() three_lines() print " " nine_lines() print " " and the print function wors, but not with def clear_screen(): and that's what I need to work? –  user2130691 Mar 4 '13 at 7:46
    
@user2130691 please add the code to the question. I can't follow without the indents. –  DarkCthulhu Mar 4 '13 at 7:54
    
@Cthulhu I posted what seems to be his code in an update... –  Schoolboy Mar 4 '13 at 8:18
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