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This question came up as I answered this question: does the standard allow and make any guarantees about friend-ing standard library classes and/or functions?

In this particular case, the situation the question was whether:

class MyUserDefinedType
{
    friend struct std::default_delete<MyUserDefinedType>;

private:
    ~MyUserDefinedType() { }
}

is guaranteed to allow MyUserDefinedType to be stored in a std::unique_ptr<MyUserDefinedType> or std::shared_ptr<MyUserDefinedType> object with the default deleter.

In general, are classes described in the standard library required to implement their functionality directly, or can they use any arbitrary level of indirection? For example, is it possible that

  • std::default_delete<MyUserDefinedType> is actually a using alias of a class defined in an inner namespace of std, in which case the friend declaration would be illegal

or

  • std::default_delete<MyUserDefinedType> calls some other class that actually does the deleting, in which case the friend declaration would not have the desired effect

or something else along those lines?

My guess is that this is UB not guaranteed to work but I am curious if this is addressed specifically by the standard.

This specific example given above works for clang trunk (w/libc++) and GCC 4.7.2 (w/libstdc++), FWIW

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I don't know the answer, but "befriending" std::default_delete<> will, if it works, enable nearly anyone to call the destructor of the class. It makes me wonder why make the destructor private in the first place if then a friend declaration is used that makes it (nearly) public again. (Admittedly, it would still mean that objects of automatic storage couldn't be de-allocated.) –  jogojapan Mar 4 '13 at 7:15
    
I would not have expected that to be true (though I stopped being a C++ expert a decade ago); experimentally it seems not to be true for latest g++ and vc++, FWIW. –  Ron Burk Mar 4 '13 at 7:20
    
i didn't think the solution was a good one, i suggested implementing a new deleter –  Stephen Lin Mar 4 '13 at 7:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

is it possible that std::default_delete<MyUserDefinedType> is actually a using alias of a class defined in an inner namespace of std, in which case the friend declaration would be illegal?

No. Per Paragraph 20.7.1.1.2 of the C++11 Standard:

namespace std {
    template <class T> struct default_delete {
        constexpr default_delete() noexcept = default;
        template <class U> default_delete(const default_delete<U>&) noexcept;
        void operator()(T*) const;
    };
}

The fact that it has to be a class template is explicitly specified. This means it cannot be an alias template. If that was the case, it would also be impossible to specialize it.

is it possible that std::default_delete<MyUserDefinedType> calls some other class that actually does the deleting, in which case the friend declaration would not have the desired effect?

Yes. Nothing in the Standard specifies that the call cannot be done by some internal helper. Per Paragraph 20.1.1.2:

void operator()(T *ptr) const;

3 Effects: calls delete on ptr.

4 Remarks: If T is an incomplete type, the program is ill-formed.

This only specifies what the effect of invoking the call operator on the default_delete<> functor should be, not how this shall be achieved concretely (whether directly inside the body of the call operator, or by delegating the task to some member function of some other class).

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1  
@StephenLin: No, I don't think so. The Standard explicitly forbids introducing new overloads in the std namespace. You can specialize some (not all) of the templates defined in the std namespace. –  Andy Prowl Mar 4 '13 at 7:40
1  
@StephenLin: You can, and if it compiles with your implementation of the C++ standard library and you are not interested in writing portable code, you are OK. Your program does not have UB. I think you should just not expect that to work with all implementations. –  Andy Prowl Mar 4 '13 at 7:58
1  
@AndyProwl ok, I guess that makes sense...I obviously don't think its a good idea to do this and think it would be better if it were addressed explicitly as disallowed, but I realize they can't plug all these holes –  Stephen Lin Mar 4 '13 at 8:01
1  
@AndyProwl: your second point perfectly nails down the issue of friend: the lack of transitivity. In a way it helps narrowing down the consequences of a class private interface change, but the inability to delegate part of the work is extremely annoying and really hampers composability and modularity :( –  Matthieu M. Mar 4 '13 at 8:15
1  
@StephenLin: That was a misunderstanding of mine. It doesn't really apply here, as @jogojapan correctly observed. I still believe that the statement in "Effects" means "ends up calling delete on ptr", but does not say where from. –  Andy Prowl Mar 4 '13 at 8:41

In general, are classes described in the standard library required to implement their functionality directly, or can they use any arbitrary level of indirection?

In general an implementation may indirect as much as it wants. Have e.g. a look at the implementations of standard containers and their iterators - or just use them wrong and see which templates are involved from the error messages. However, since default_delete is nothing magic, that should be a one-liner, you can expect it to do the work itself, but it's not guaranteed.

My guess is that this is UB but I am curious if this is addressed specifically by the standard.

It's not UB, it's just unspecified.

You could be sure if you just specialized default_delete<MyUserDefinedType> (it is allowed to specialize standard libraray templates), but I would not do that.

I would not use friendship at all, especially not if it comes to templates that have not been specialized. Consider this:

//your code
class MyUserDefinedType
{
    friend struct std::default_delete<MyUserDefinedType>; //for deletion
private:  
    int veryPrivateData;
    ~MyUserDefinedType() { }
};

//evil colleague's code:
namespace std {
  //we may specialize std-templates for UDTs...
  template<>
  struct default_delete<MyUserDefinedType>
  {
    constexpr default_delete() noexcept = default;
    template <class U> default_delete(const default_delete<U>&) noexcept {}
    void operator()(T* pt) const { delete pt; }

    //sneaky...
    void access(MyUserDefinedType& mudt, int i) const
    { mudt.veryPrivateData = i; }
  };
}

void somewhere_deep_in_the_code()
{
  MyUserDefinedType& myUDT = /*something...*/;
  std::default_delete<MyUserDefinedType>().access(myUDT, 42); //tricked you!
}

Friends can do anything to you. Choose them with caution. In this case, I'd really recommend a custom deleter - assuming it makes any sense making the destructor private but providing access to it via the deleter.

share|improve this answer
    
yeah i suggested a custom deleter, this is not my recommended solution –  Stephen Lin Mar 4 '13 at 7:48
    
+1 thanks for the input though, I'm still hoping someone can find a very authoritative quote about friend-ing standard classes/functions –  Stephen Lin Mar 4 '13 at 7:51

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