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I need to randomly shuffle the following Array in Android:

int[] solutionArray = {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1};

Is there any function in the SDK to do that?

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The solution you marked as accepted answer has a couple of mistakes. See my answer. –  Dan Bray Aug 27 '13 at 4:59
    
This is the SDK method you are looking for Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(array)); –  Louie Nov 5 '13 at 0:28
    
@Louie No, that doesn't work. That would create a List<int[]> containing one entry. See my answer for the way to achieve this using Collections.shuffle(). –  Duncan Jan 30 at 10:52

8 Answers 8

up vote 84 down vote accepted

Using Collections to shuffle an array of primitive types is a bit of an overkill...

It is simple enough to implement the function yourself, using for example the Fisher–Yates shuffle:

import java.util.*;

class Test
{
  public static void main(String args[])
  {
    int[] solutionArray = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 16, 15, 14, 13, 12, 11 };

    shuffleArray(solutionArray);
    for (int i = 0; i < solutionArray.length; i++)
    {
      System.out.print(solutionArray[i] + " ");
    }
    System.out.println();
  }

  // Implementing Fisher–Yates shuffle
  static void shuffleArray(int[] ar)
  {
    Random rnd = new Random();
    for (int i = ar.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
      int index = rnd.nextInt(i + 1);
      // Simple swap
      int a = ar[index];
      ar[index] = ar[i];
      ar[i] = a;
    }
  }
}
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8  
Extremely trivial nitpick, but you can just use println() instead of println(""). Clearer in intent I think :) –  Cowan Sep 17 '10 at 2:09
    
@PhiLho How is it different than java collections's shuffle? –  AKS Aug 20 '13 at 22:14
5  
It'd be much better to use Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(array)); then making a shuffle your self. –  Louie Nov 5 '13 at 0:12
5  
@Louie Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(array)) doesn't work, because Arrays.asList(array) returns Collection<int[]> not Collection<Integer> as you thought. –  Adam Stelmaszczyk Dec 13 '13 at 12:33
3  
@exhuma Because if you have an array of thousands or millions of primitive values to sort, wrapping each one in an object just to do a sort is a bit costly, both in memory and in CPU. –  PhiLho Jul 11 at 11:11

Here is a simple way using ArrayLists

ArrayList<Integer> cards = new ArrayList<Integer>();
for(int i=1;i<=52;i++)
{
    this.cards.add(i);
}
Collections.shuffle(this.cards);
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Why this.cards instead of cards? You appear to be declaring cards as a local variable, not a field, and even if it was a field, there isn't any conflicting local variable (the only reason to use this for accessing fields). Also, your answer does not shuffle the given array of {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 6, 5, 4, 3, 2, 1}, rather {1, 2, 3...52}. –  bcsb1001 Sep 20 at 9:55

Here is a working and efficient Fisher–Yates shuffle array function:

private void ShuffleArray(int[] array)
{
    int index;
    Random random = new Random();
    for (int i = array.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
        index = random.nextInt(i + 1);
        if (index != i)
        {
            array[index] ^= array[i];
            array[i] ^= array[index];
            array[index] ^= array[i];
        }
    }
}

or

private void ShuffleArray(int[] array)
{
    int index, temp;
    Random random = new Random();
    for (int i = array.length - 1; i > 0; i--)
    {
        index = random.nextInt(i + 1);
        temp = array[index];
        array[index] = array[i];
        array[i] = temp;
    }
}
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1  
Voted up because I needed a solution that did not have the high overhead of creating a Collection of Integer –  mwk Sep 30 '13 at 17:27

Look at the Collections class, specifically shuffle(...)

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1  
How do you use this Collections class in Android ? You need to do a special import (CRTL SHIT O doesn't work) to use it ? –  Hubert Oct 5 '09 at 12:23
12  
@Hubert I like this CTRL SHIT O keyboard shotcut! ;-) –  splash Aug 27 '13 at 10:47

Collections class has an efficient method for shuffling, that can be copied, so as not to depend on it:

/**
 * Usage:
 *    int[] array = {1, 2, 3};
 *    Util.shuffle(array);
 */
public class Util {

    private static Random random;

    /**
     * Code from method java.util.Collections.shuffle();
     */
    public static void shuffle(int[] array) {
        if (random == null) random = new Random();
        int count = array.length;
        for (int i = count; i > 1; i--) {
            swap(array, i - 1, random.nextInt(i));
        }
    }

    private static void swap(int[] array, int i, int j) {
        int temp = array[i];
        array[i] = array[j];
        array[j] = temp;
    }
}
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Using Array List can help you solving the problem of shuffling without applying much of logic and consuming less time. Here is what i suggest:

ArrayList<Integer> x = new ArrayList<Integer>();
for(int i=1;i<=add.length();i++)
{
x.add(i);
}
Collections.shuffle(x);``
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Probably not the latter - consuming less time. In fact this is certainly slower than the primitive implementations above. –  Boris the Spider Sep 22 at 9:18

Here is a complete solution using the Collections.shuffle approach:

public static void shuffleArray(int[] array) {
  List<Integer> list = new ArrayList<>();
  for (int i : array) {
    list.add(i);
  }

  Collections.shuffle(list);

  for (int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
    array[i] = list.get(i);
  }    
}

Note that it suffers due to Java's inability to smoothly translate between int[] and Integer[] (and thus int[] and List<Integer>).

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This is a modification of @Dan Bray's answer. Shuffle any type of array:

public static <T> shuffleArray(T[] array, Random random) {
  T temp;
  int index;
  for (int i = array.length - 1; i > 0; i--) {
    index = random.nextInt(i + 1);

    temp = array[index];
    array[index] = array[i];
    array[i] = temp;
  }
}

Note: this function doesn't work with the primitive data types.

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If you already have a T[] what does this do that Collections.shuffle(Arrays.asList(array)) doesn't? –  Boris the Spider Sep 22 at 9:17

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