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given numbers in an unsorted way say X:{4,2,5,1,8,2,7}

How do you find rank of number??

Eg: Rank of 4:4 : Rank of 5:5

Complexity has to be O(lg n).

It can be done in complexity of O(lg n) with the help of Red Black Trees and Augmented Data structure approach(one of the fascinating stuff nowadays). lets make use of order statistic treeOrder Statistic Tree

Algorithm:
RANK(T,x)

//T: order-statistic tree, x: node(to find rank of this node)
r = x.left.size + 1
y=x
While y != T.root
    if y==y.p.right
        r= + y.p.left.size + 1
    y=y.p
Return r;

any help is appreciated.

are there any better approach than this??

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No attempt shown. –  Mitch Wheat Mar 4 '13 at 9:10
    
What's a rank of a number in an array (permutation?)? I can't find any definition that fits these data types, let alone the example –  Jan Dvorak Mar 4 '13 at 9:11
    
homework question? –  robert Mar 4 '13 at 9:11
    
The only function I can think of that corresponds to your data is O(1) to compute, not O(n) –  Jan Dvorak Mar 4 '13 at 9:13
    
downvoters:please review my solution. –  Gaurav Patil Mar 4 '13 at 9:39

1 Answer 1

Given numbers in an unsorted way, say X:{4,2,5,1,8,2,7}

How do you find rank of number?

Rank is the position of the element when it is sorted.

Complexity has to be O(lg n).

That's impossible. You have to look at each element at least once. Thus, you can't get better than O(n), and it's trivial in O(n):

  • set found to false
  • set smaller to 0
  • for each number in array
    • if the number is smaller than needle
      • increment the smaller counter
    • if the number is equal to the needle
      • set found to true
  • if found, return smaller+1, else return error

It can be done in complexity of O(lg n) with the help of Red Black Trees and Augmented Data structure approach(one of the fascinating stuff nowadays). Let's make use of order statistic tree

The problem is you don't have an order-statistic tree, and you don't have the time to build one. Building an order-statistic tree takes more than O(lg n) time*.


But let's say you have the time to build an order-statistic tree. Since extracting the sorted list of nodes in a binary search tree takes linear time, building an order-statistic tree cannot be faster than sorting an array directly.

So, let's sort the array directly. Then, finding the rank of an element is equivalent to finding the element in a sorted array. This is a well known task that can be solved in O(lg n) via binary search (repeatedly split the array in half until you find the element). It turns out that the order-statistic tree does not, quite, help. In fact, you can imagine the binary search as a lookup in an order-statistic tree (except the tree doesn't actually exist).


If x could change at runtime, then order-statistic trees do help. Then, element removal/addition takes Th(lg n) (worst-case) time, while it takes Th(n)* (average-case) in an ordinary sorted array because you need shift the elements around. With x immutable, order-statistic trees don't speed up anything over plain arrays.


* Technically, O(lg n) is a set of functions that grow asymptotically no more than lg n. When I say "more than O(lg n)", the correct interpretation is "more than every function in O(lg n). Incidentally, this is equivalent to saying the run time is omega(lg n) (note the omega is lowercase).

Th(lg n) is the set of functions that are asymptotically equal to lg n, up to a constant. Expressing the same using O(lg n) and english while staying technically correct would be awkward.

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