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hi i have condition need to be check

if(staffid!=23||staffid!=24||staffid!=25||staffid!=26||staffid!=27||staffid!=29||staffid!=31)
{
  do the  req  thing ..
}

right now i checking the condition like this . is their any better way to write this condition

thank you

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1  
Is it an AND condition? –  rahul Oct 5 '09 at 12:47
4  
You mean && instead of || right? –  Ron Warholic Oct 5 '09 at 12:48
    
I'm sure you mean && instead of ||. By DeMorgan's Law, Not P or Not Q = Not (P and Q). Now, assuming staffid cannot be 23 and 24 simultaneously, Not (P and Q) will always evaluate to true. (PS - I made this silly mistake the first day of my current internship :P ) –  xbonez Oct 6 '10 at 13:15

10 Answers 10

up vote 25 down vote accepted

Merging several of the other answers (mjv, pasta, Mike Hofer, R. Bemrose) together you will come up with the following code.

  1. Use a function to test if the staff ID is valid, that way you only need to change one place.
  2. An int array doesn't have a Contains method, so you will need to convert it to an IList (Unless using the extension methods provided in 3.0 in the System.Linq namespace).

As for the code:

if(!isStaffIDValid(staffid))
{
    //do the req thing ..
}

...

Then in either the same class, or more preferably a global class use this code:

public static IList<int> notAllowedIDs = new int[] { 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29, 31 };
public static bool isStaffIDValid(int staffID)
{
    return !notAllowedIDs.Contains(staffID);
}

This provides more maintainable code that can be easily updated.

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damn, beat me to it! +1 –  Darnell Oct 5 '09 at 12:47
    
btw, you're missing a close parens. –  Darnell Oct 5 '09 at 12:48
4  
Could use a HashSet<int>: private static HashSet<int> excluded = new HashSet<int>(new [] { ... }); then return !excluded.Contains(id). –  user7116 Oct 5 '09 at 15:46
1  
If there are a lot of IDs, HashSet will be faster. If there are not, HashSet may or may not be faster, but it is probably irrelevant anyways.. –  Brian Oct 5 '09 at 18:05
    
yes you can use .Contains (if youre on 3.0 i think) it's an extension method on System.Linq namespace. –  Darnell Oct 6 '09 at 4:43

Errr.. isn't that equivalent to:

if (true) { do the req thing... }

Unless staffid can simultaneously be 23 and 24 and 25 and 26 and 27 and 29 and 31.

Imagine 2 cases:

  1. staffid = 23
  2. staffid != 23

Your statement:

if(staffid!=23 ||
   staffid!=24 ||
   staffid!=25 ||
   staffid!=26 ||
   staffid!=27 ||
   staffid!=29 ||
   staffid!=31)
{
  do the  req  thing ..
}

Case 1 passes the second test (staffid != 24), and case 2 passes the first test (staffid!=23). Since case 1 and case 2 together account for all cases, all values of staffid should pass your test.

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2  
I don't think this is what he was intending. ;) –  Chris Oct 5 '09 at 12:48
2  
@Chris - neither do I, but I thought it was probably more worthwhile to point out his code was broken, than to guess at what he did intend. –  Dominic Rodger Oct 5 '09 at 12:49
    
Although, the title of the question specifically mentions or, so I reckon bets are off as to what he's trying to do! –  Dominic Rodger Oct 5 '09 at 12:51
    
This is not even programming, then: it is simple classical logic. –  Robert L Oct 5 '09 at 13:12

Can't imagine what your actual problem is, the statement looks wrong.

If there are lots of "not"s in a complex condition, just convert it to say the contrary. If there is both a if and else section, swap them. If there is no else, put the "not" to the beginning. Your condition looks wrong, just to show what I mean, here is the converted one:

if (staffid == 23 
  && staffid == 24
  && staffid == 25
  && staffid == 26
  && staffid == 27
  && staffid == 29
  && staffid == 31)
{
  //if there was an else block before, it will be here now.
}
else
{
  //do the  req  thing ..
}

Then you can more easily understand the condition, and more easily see that it can't be what you need...

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2  
+1, De Morgans for the win! Also it more easily shows the mistake in the logic. –  Chris Oct 5 '09 at 13:29

Use a function allowStaff(staffid, "Payment"). Then have all your checking done in one central function allowStaff. This way even if you get a clever idea, you can change it in one place and quicker!

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First, what is the data type of staffid? Is it an enum? An int?

Then, the variable's name is sending up a red flag to me. Are you hard-coding behavior for specific individuals or roles into your application when those behaviors/roles may change down the road? You may want to rethink that.

Now, that out of the way, and assuming that staffid is an int:

int[] inValidIds = {23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29, 31};
if (! ((IList<int>)inValidIds.Contains(staffId)))
{
    // Do stuff;
}

See here.

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hi mike the data type i am using is int for checking the staffid once if id is present i sending the return value as false from my validation layer to bussineess layer so onc ethe value is present means i need to send the return value as false –  happysmile Oct 5 '09 at 13:27

Assuming you mean:

    if (staffid != 23 && staffid != 24 && staffid != 25 && staffid != 26 && staffid != 27 && staffid != 29 && staffid != 31)
    {
        // Do Stuff
    }

Saw a nice extension method to do this:

public static bool In<T>(this T source, params T[] list)
{
  if(null==source) throw new ArgumentNullException("source");
  return list.Contains(source);
}

so your code would be:

if(!staffid.In(23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29, 31))
{
  do the  req  thing ..
}

From this answer

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hi JDunkerley, your code worked for me perfect thank you –  happysmile Oct 5 '09 at 14:00

I think Chris is on the right track here, but why convert to a list?

public static int[] notAllowedIDs = new int[] { 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 29, 31 };

// Other code here

if (Array.IndexOf(notAllowedIDs, staffId) < 0)
{
    // do the  req  thing ..
}

Additional notes: Array.IndexOf and List.Contains are both O(n) operations, where n is the number of elements. However, Array.IndexOf saves a conversion from an array to a list.

Array.IndexOf returns the array's lower bound - 1 when the element isn't found, which is -1 for most arrays.

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Array extends the IList. The .Contains method is actually from the IList interface. Polymorphism! But good point. I modified my answer to incorporate this suggestion. +1 –  Chris Oct 5 '09 at 18:01
    
@Chris: I usually deal with Java, so arrays implementing IList seems... odd to me. –  Powerlord Oct 5 '09 at 18:12
    
Wait, I misspoke... while Array does extend IList, it does not provide an implementation to the .Contains method. This is allowable because the Array class is declared as abstract. So Array.Contains doesn't exist. –  Chris Oct 5 '09 at 18:56

How about just

if(staffid < 23 || staffid == 30 || staffid > 31)
{
    do the  req  thing ..
}
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Put your lists of staff id's in a List, and use LINQ to query a list of integers (if staffid not in list).

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not a bad solution but kind of overkill for what he's trying to accomplish –  Jeff Hornby Oct 5 '09 at 13:17

EDIT: your logic is probably wrong. You can use a switch with cases that cascade, e.g.

switch(var)
{
   case foo:
   case bar:
      doIt();
      break;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nope. The post is tagged C# –  JeffH Oct 5 '09 at 12:52
1  
@JeffH uh... msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/06tc147t(VS.80).aspx So what do you mean by "Nope'? –  Calyth Oct 5 '09 at 15:07
    
Hmmm, maybe @JeffH meant: the variables foo and bar can't be used in the switch statement unless they are const. Also var is a reserved word in C# 3.0. –  Chris Oct 5 '09 at 18:22
    
which needless to say your code isn't invalid if the variable are const and you and using c# 2.0. –  Chris Oct 5 '09 at 18:26
    
Ah. I just left the syntax as an exercise for the OP :p –  Calyth Oct 5 '09 at 19:36

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