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I have this code:

String path = new java.io.File(".").getCanonicalPath();
File file = new File(path + "\\RunFromCode.bat");
file.createNewFile();
PrintWriter writer = new PrintWriter(file, "UTF-8");
for(int i=0;i<=MAX;i++) {
    writer.println("@cd " + i);
    writer.println(NATIVE SYSTEM COMMANDS);
    ....
    ....
writer.close();
Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("cmd /c start " + path + "\\RunFromCode.bat");
p.waitFor();
file.delete();

What happens is that the file deleted before it actually executed.

Is this because the .bat file contains only native system call? How can I make the deletion after the execution of the .bat file? (I don't know what the output of the .bat file will be, since it dynamically changes).

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2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

By using start, you are askingcmd.exe to start the batch file in the background:

Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("cmd /c start " + path + "\\RunFromCode.bat");

So, the process which you launch from Java (cmd.exe) returns before the background process is finished.

Remove the start command to run the batch file in the foreground - then, waitFor() will wait for the batch file completion:

Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("cmd /c " + path + "\\RunFromCode.bat");

According to OP, it is important to have the console window available - this can be done by adding the /wait parameter, as suggested by @Noofiz. The following SSCCE worked for me:

public class Command {

public static void main(String[] args) throws java.io.IOException, InterruptedException {
       String path = "C:\\Users\\andreas";

       Process p = Runtime.getRuntime().exec("cmd /c start /wait " + path + "\\RunFromCode.bat");

       System.out.println("Waiting for batch file ...");
       p.waitFor();
       System.out.println("Batch file done.");
   }
}

If RunFromCode.bat executes the EXIT command, the command window is automatically closed. Otherwise, the command window remains open until you explicitly exit it with EXIT - the java process is waiting until the window is closed in either case.

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Removing start will hide the CMD, which I don't want to happen. Is there another way to still have the CMD opened while the execution? –  Maroun Maroun Mar 4 '13 at 10:16
    
So you want to see the output from the batch file in the command window? –  Andreas Mar 4 '13 at 10:19
    
Yes, it is important for this task. –  Maroun Maroun Mar 4 '13 at 10:19
    
Ok, I knew that this also works somehow, but @Noofiz was faster :) –  Andreas Mar 4 '13 at 10:20
1  
Thank you for the explanation, this works. –  Maroun Maroun Mar 4 '13 at 10:26

Try adding /wait parameter to start command.

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Thank you, I didn't know about this command. –  Maroun Maroun Mar 4 '13 at 10:25

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