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I have a hardware module that can calculate a crc quite quickly on the project I am working on, however it returns a 32-bit number (as it is a crc32). I need to fit the crc into a uint8_t for the protocol formatting being used.

I was thinking that since the crc represents the remainder of a 32-bit polynomial division if I simply take the most significant byte that would be the equivalent of rounding the remainder to 8 bits. I understand I would not get the ability to detect errors as well as I would with a 32-bit crc, but would it be as good as doing a 8-bit crc in software? surely the result will be the same on both sides since they both have access to the same data and polynomial, but would that result still have all the properties of a crc?

Thanks

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My first impulse would be to use the 8 LSBs since they will shuffle more but this approach will not be as strong as a real CRC-8 since you are using a truncated polynomial. I recommend writing a simulation to compare results. –  guga Mar 4 '13 at 12:38
    
That sounds like a sane idea, I have read that Hamming Distance (HD) is a good measure of how well the algorithm performs, maybe I will look into this more. Thanks. –  othane Mar 5 '13 at 9:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Yes, assuming that you grab the most significant byte on both sides, then the result will be the same on both sides. Watch out for endianess.

No, picking 8-bits out of a 32-bit CRC will not have the same properties as an 8-bit CRC. It might still be pretty good at detecting errors as compared to a real 8-bit CRC. But not as good. A real 8-bit CRC has been optimized for that purpose. See Koopman's paper for examples of the analyses that are done.

Below is an 8-bit CRC implementation using a carefully selected 8-bit polynomial.

#include <stddef.h>

/* 8-bit CRC with polynomial x^8+x^6+x^3+x^2+1, 0x14D.
   Chosen based on Koopman, et al. (0xA6 in his notation = 0x14D >> 1):
   http://www.ece.cmu.edu/~koopman/roses/dsn04/koopman04_crc_poly_embedded.pdf
 */

static unsigned char crc8_table[] = {
    0x00, 0x3e, 0x7c, 0x42, 0xf8, 0xc6, 0x84, 0xba, 0x95, 0xab, 0xe9, 0xd7,
    0x6d, 0x53, 0x11, 0x2f, 0x4f, 0x71, 0x33, 0x0d, 0xb7, 0x89, 0xcb, 0xf5,
    0xda, 0xe4, 0xa6, 0x98, 0x22, 0x1c, 0x5e, 0x60, 0x9e, 0xa0, 0xe2, 0xdc,
    0x66, 0x58, 0x1a, 0x24, 0x0b, 0x35, 0x77, 0x49, 0xf3, 0xcd, 0x8f, 0xb1,
    0xd1, 0xef, 0xad, 0x93, 0x29, 0x17, 0x55, 0x6b, 0x44, 0x7a, 0x38, 0x06,
    0xbc, 0x82, 0xc0, 0xfe, 0x59, 0x67, 0x25, 0x1b, 0xa1, 0x9f, 0xdd, 0xe3,
    0xcc, 0xf2, 0xb0, 0x8e, 0x34, 0x0a, 0x48, 0x76, 0x16, 0x28, 0x6a, 0x54,
    0xee, 0xd0, 0x92, 0xac, 0x83, 0xbd, 0xff, 0xc1, 0x7b, 0x45, 0x07, 0x39,
    0xc7, 0xf9, 0xbb, 0x85, 0x3f, 0x01, 0x43, 0x7d, 0x52, 0x6c, 0x2e, 0x10,
    0xaa, 0x94, 0xd6, 0xe8, 0x88, 0xb6, 0xf4, 0xca, 0x70, 0x4e, 0x0c, 0x32,
    0x1d, 0x23, 0x61, 0x5f, 0xe5, 0xdb, 0x99, 0xa7, 0xb2, 0x8c, 0xce, 0xf0,
    0x4a, 0x74, 0x36, 0x08, 0x27, 0x19, 0x5b, 0x65, 0xdf, 0xe1, 0xa3, 0x9d,
    0xfd, 0xc3, 0x81, 0xbf, 0x05, 0x3b, 0x79, 0x47, 0x68, 0x56, 0x14, 0x2a,
    0x90, 0xae, 0xec, 0xd2, 0x2c, 0x12, 0x50, 0x6e, 0xd4, 0xea, 0xa8, 0x96,
    0xb9, 0x87, 0xc5, 0xfb, 0x41, 0x7f, 0x3d, 0x03, 0x63, 0x5d, 0x1f, 0x21,
    0x9b, 0xa5, 0xe7, 0xd9, 0xf6, 0xc8, 0x8a, 0xb4, 0x0e, 0x30, 0x72, 0x4c,
    0xeb, 0xd5, 0x97, 0xa9, 0x13, 0x2d, 0x6f, 0x51, 0x7e, 0x40, 0x02, 0x3c,
    0x86, 0xb8, 0xfa, 0xc4, 0xa4, 0x9a, 0xd8, 0xe6, 0x5c, 0x62, 0x20, 0x1e,
    0x31, 0x0f, 0x4d, 0x73, 0xc9, 0xf7, 0xb5, 0x8b, 0x75, 0x4b, 0x09, 0x37,
    0x8d, 0xb3, 0xf1, 0xcf, 0xe0, 0xde, 0x9c, 0xa2, 0x18, 0x26, 0x64, 0x5a,
    0x3a, 0x04, 0x46, 0x78, 0xc2, 0xfc, 0xbe, 0x80, 0xaf, 0x91, 0xd3, 0xed,
    0x57, 0x69, 0x2b, 0x15};

unsigned crc8(unsigned crc, unsigned char *data, size_t len)
{
    unsigned char *end;

    if (len == 0)
        return crc;
    crc ^= 0xff;
    end = data + len;
    do {
        crc = crc8_table[crc ^ *data++];
    } while (data < end);
    return crc ^ 0xff;
}

/* this was used to generate the table and to test the table-version

#define POLY 0xB2

unsigned crc8_slow(unsigned crc, unsigned char *data, size_t len)
{
    unsigned char *end;

    if (len == 0)
        return crc;
    crc ^= 0xff;
    end = data + len;
    do {
        crc ^= *data++;
        crc = crc & 1 ? (crc >> 1) ^ POLY : crc >> 1;
        crc = crc & 1 ? (crc >> 1) ^ POLY : crc >> 1;
        crc = crc & 1 ? (crc >> 1) ^ POLY : crc >> 1;
        crc = crc & 1 ? (crc >> 1) ^ POLY : crc >> 1;
        crc = crc & 1 ? (crc >> 1) ^ POLY : crc >> 1;
        crc = crc & 1 ? (crc >> 1) ^ POLY : crc >> 1;
        crc = crc & 1 ? (crc >> 1) ^ POLY : crc >> 1;
        crc = crc & 1 ? (crc >> 1) ^ POLY : crc >> 1;
    } while (data < end);
    return crc ^ 0xff;
}
*/

#include <stdio.h>

#define SIZE 16384

int main(void)
{
    unsigned char data[SIZE];
    size_t got;
    unsigned crc;

    crc = 0;
    do {
        got = fread(data, 1, SIZE, stdin);
        crc = crc8(crc, data, got);
    } while (got == SIZE);
    printf("%02x\n", crc);
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
The header comment in your code mentions poly 0xA6, which Koopman likes, but the later definition is #define POLY 0xB2. Can you please clarify? –  srking Mar 4 '13 at 19:16
    
There are two ways to define a CRC, forward or reversed bits. The implementations of CRCs very frequently use the reversed bits convention, which this one does. 0xb2 is 0x4d reversed. The other common convention is to invert all of the bits of the CRC, which avoids a sequence of zeros on a zero CRC resulting in a zero CRC. The code above does that as well. –  Mark Adler Mar 4 '13 at 20:17
    
Thanks Mark this is the best answer so far as in it is to the point I was trying to find out about. But I am still no sure why it will not be as good as a real 8 bit version. I skim read the paper you posted about polynomial choice for different crc methods. But still it is not clear to me if the top most significant byte would pick up as many bit errors as a 8-bit version, and if not, why not? –  othane Mar 5 '13 at 8:35
    
The simplest example is burst error detection. Any CRC-n can detect burst errors of length n bits in the message. A CRC-8 is guaranteed to detect any error pattern 8 bits in length anywhere in a message. However 8 bits pulled from a CRC-32 does not have that guarantee. There are many other properties such as Hamming distance, performance with random bit errors at various error rates, etc. that can be measured to select a good CRC polynomial. All of that work put into selecting a CRC polynomial is completely discarded when using a subset of the resulting CRC. –  Mark Adler Mar 5 '13 at 16:01

surely the result will be the same on both sides since they both have access to the same data and polynomial

No, not always! Read more for my explanation.

but would that result still have all the properties of a crc?

Yes, CRC will still be CRC. It doesn't matter if it's scale is 8, 16 or 32 bit.

CRC-8 sores all messages down to one of your 256 values. But if your message is bigger than a few bytes, the possibility of multiple inputs having the same hash value grows higher and higher.

CRC-8: < 64 bytes

CRC-16: < 16K bytes

CRC-32: < 512M bytes

CRC-32 gives you about 4 billion available hash values, so the possibility of multiple inputs having the same hash is low.

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Sorry it may not have been clear what I was trying to say. I am doing the crc calculation with full 32 bit resolution on both sides. It is just the comparison that is being done at 8 bits as I cannot fit it in the protocol packet size. So I realize that the 8 bit version will detect less bit errors than a 32 bit version. What I wish to know is, if I compare only 8 bits of the crc, will that have the same error detection ability as using 8 bits from the start? –  othane Mar 5 '13 at 8:17

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