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I'm using Mockito as a Maven dependency but am concerned about staying on the right side of the law when delivering this (proprietary) software to the customer. The MIT license doesn't seem to make it clear. There's actually only one file (AcceptanceIT.java) that uses Mockito but this is in compile scope rather than test scope due to the way the acceptance tests are run.

Currently all Java files including AcceptanceIT.java have a single copyright line at the top:

// Copyright (C) 2013 <<company name>> All rights reserved

Ideally wouldn't want to remove this but it doesn't seem to fit with the MIT license text being there as well. Starting to wonder about converting the tests to use another mocking framework (EasyMock?) instead. Seems a bit drastic to do that only for this reason but might be forced into it because of the unclear license wording - any advice would be appreciated...

EDIT: Following Aaron Digulla's useful advice I've changed the copyright text for AcceptanceIT to:

// Copyright (C) 2013 <<company name>> All rights reserved
// Note: The Mockito dependency has an "MIT license" - see http://opensource.org/licenses/MIT
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

IANAL

The MIT license is one of the most permissive licenses around. Some pointers that help you understand what this means:

If you link MIT code into your application, this linking doesn't "leak" into your work. So just calling Mockito methods doesn't mean your code is now under the MIT license.

The MIT licence also doesn't require you to include the Mockito sources when you give your work to your customer (GPL would require that, for example, even when you can apply the classpath exception).

So even if you would need Mockito at runtime in your application, this wouldn't have an influence on your code or the license / contract that governs its ownership.

More pointers:

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Thanks, that's helpful. The permissiveness you mentioned is reassuring but I'd like to make sure I get this right for the delivery. The first link you posted mentions "include the original copyright" as the only must. Just wondering where this should slot in. Copying it underneath the current Copyright header in the test code seems a bit of a contradiction. Currently there is no "LICENSE.TXT" file in the customer's source code - perhaps I need to add one to cover this but am a bit worried this may confuse or scare the customer (they're a delicate breed! :-)) –  Steve Chambers Mar 4 '13 at 11:22
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"include the original copyright" means "in the sources of Mockito", not in your work. If you don't modify Mockito, you don't even need to mention it in the LICENSE.TXT but it would be a nice thing to do. –  Aaron Digulla Mar 4 '13 at 16:15
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Thanks, that makes sense. Have modified the copyright for the one class that uses Mockito - see edit in the original q. –  Steve Chambers Mar 5 '13 at 8:58
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If you compile your software and the compiled software contains object code that derived from the source-code of that MIT-licensed part then you need to provide the coypright information as demanded (that is normally the whole text with MIT with the coypright line on top) with your compiled software.

If your compiled object code does not have any dependency on the MIT-licensed software then your software is not part of it. You just used a MIT licensed code-base in your acceptance tests but if they don't ship with your software package, that MIT licensed code-base has nothing to do with your final software.

At least this is how I see it as a software developer.

Mockito license text is:

The MIT License

Copyright (c) 2007 Mockito contributors

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy
of this software and associated documentation files (the "Software"), to deal
in the Software without restriction, including without limitation the rights
to use, copy, modify, merge, publish, distribute, sublicense, and/or sell
copies of the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is
furnished to do so, subject to the following conditions:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in
all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

THE SOFTWARE IS PROVIDED "AS IS", WITHOUT WARRANTY OF ANY KIND, EXPRESS OR
IMPLIED, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO THE WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY,
FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE AND NONINFRINGEMENT. IN NO EVENT SHALL THE
AUTHORS OR COPYRIGHT HOLDERS BE LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM, DAMAGES OR OTHER
LIABILITY, WHETHER IN AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, TORT OR OTHERWISE, ARISING FROM,
OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE SOFTWARE OR THE USE OR OTHER DEALINGS IN
THE SOFTWARE.

If your compiled software contains part of Mockito, then place this information with your software.

It's written here:

The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all copies or substantial portions of the Software.

this is (the only) requirement of the license. If you don't go conform with it, you loose the right to use the software. Happy hacking.

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