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I have an output like the following:

FA-7E 0 500009730007C118
FA-8E 0 500009730007C11C
FA-7F 0 500009730007C158
FA-10F 0 500009730007C164

that I would like to translate it into:

FA-7E 0 50:00:09:73:00:07:C1:18
FA-8E 0 50:00:09:73:00:07:C1:1C
FA-7F 0 50:00:09:73:00:07:C1:58
FA-10F 0 50:00:09:73:00:07:C1:64

please advise.

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The regex in question is [0-9A-F]{2}(?=[0-9A-F]). I can't help with the rest –  Jan Dvorak Mar 4 '13 at 11:13
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted
$ awk '{gsub(/../,"&:",$NF);sub(/:$/,"")}1' file
FA-7E 0 50:00:09:73:00:07:C1:18
FA-8E 0 50:00:09:73:00:07:C1:1C
FA-7F 0 50:00:09:73:00:07:C1:58
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+1 you are quick! :) –  Kent Mar 4 '13 at 11:20
    
Could you explain what 1 at the end means? –  leafei Mar 4 '13 at 11:21
    
awk scripts are a series of <condition> { <action> } statements that get evaluated for each record (line by default) in the input file. The default condition is true and the default action is print the current record, so if you just write an action statement like {gsub(/../,"&:",$NF);sub(/:$/,"")} then it gets executed as the missing condition before it is assumed to be true, and if you just write a constant like 1 where a condition should go then that's a true condition and so invokes the default print action. –  Ed Morton Mar 4 '13 at 11:24
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Sed solution:

sed -e 's/\([0-9A-F]\{2\}\)/\1:/g' -e 's/:\([- ]\|$\)/\1/g'

The first substitution adds : after each pair of hex digits, the second one removes the extra colons from the first column and the end of line.

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Thanks but this will also substitute chars like 10H. –  leafei Mar 4 '13 at 11:24
    
@leafei: Where do you expect the characters to appear? –  choroba Mar 4 '13 at 11:26
    
The last column. –  leafei Mar 4 '13 at 11:51
    
@leafei: Please post an example with the desired output. –  choroba Mar 4 '13 at 11:52
    
sorry I didn't make the question clear, the first column may have chars like FA-10F. –  leafei Mar 4 '13 at 12:03
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A perl variation:

perl -pe 's/\w\w(?=\w+$)/$&:/g' file
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not the best but works:

perl -lane 'push @a,$F[2]=~/../g;$F[2]=join ":",@a;undef @a;print "@F"' your_file
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