Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is currying?

How currying can be done in c++?

Please Explain binders in STL container?

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 25 down vote accepted

In short, currying takes a function f(x, y) and given a fixed Y, gives a new function g(x) where

g(x) == f(x, Y)

This new function may be called in situations where only one argument is supplied, and passes the call on to the original f function with the fixed Y argument.

The binders in the STL allow you do to this for C++ functions. For example:

#include <functional>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

// declare a binary function object
class adder: public binary_function<int, int, int> {
public:
    int operator()(int x, int y) const
    {
        return x + y;
    }
};

int main()
{
    // initialise some sample data
    vector<int> a, b;
    a.push_back(1);
    a.push_back(2);
    a.push_back(3);

    // here we declare a function object f and try it out
    adder f;
    cout << "f(2, 3) = " << f(2, 3) << endl;

    // transform() expects a function with one argument, so we use
    // bind2nd to make a new function based on f, that takes one
    // argument and adds 5 to it
    transform(a.begin(), a.end(), back_inserter(b), bind2nd(f, 5));

    // output b to see what we got
    cout << "b = [" << endl;
    for (vector<int>::iterator i = b.begin(); i != b.end(); ++i) {
        cout << "  " << *i << endl;
    }
    cout << "]" << endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Can you add code to explain this in c++ –  yesraaj Sep 30 '08 at 7:38
1  
This is in c++ raj. –  Marcin Oct 1 '08 at 23:57
3  
Marcin: raj requested the C++ example before I added it. :) –  Greg Hewgill Oct 2 '08 at 0:16
4  
I wish I could vote up a comment trail. This comment chain is amusing. :) –  que que Oct 2 '08 at 16:39
12  
Actually, I think this answer is wrong; what this answer describes is "partial application", which the bind functions do. "Currying" is the process of transforming a function taking N arguments into a function taking one argument and returning a function with N-1 arguments, e.g. void (*)(int, short, bool) becomes X (*)(int) with X being void (*)(short, bool). See haskell.org/haskellwiki/Currying for all you ever wanted to know about currying and partial function application. –  Frerich Raabe Sep 20 '11 at 17:34

Simplifying Gregg's example, using tr1:

#include <functional> 
using namespace std;
using namespace std::tr1;
using namespace std::tr1::placeholders;

int f(int, int);
..
int main(){
    function<int(int)> g     = bind(f, _1, 5); // g(x) == f(x, 5)
    function<int(int)> h     = bind(f, 2, _1); // h(x) == f(2, x)
    function<int(int,int)> j = bind(g, _2);    // j(x,y) == g(y)
}

Tr1 functional components allow you to write rich functional-style code in C++. As well, C++0x will allow for in-line lambda functions to do this as well:

int f(int, int);
..
int main(){
    auto g = [](int x){ return f(x,5); };      // g(x) == f(x, 5)
    auto h = [](int x){ return f(2,x); };      // h(x) == f(2, x)
    auto j = [](int x, int y){ return g(y); }; // j(x,y) == g(y)
}

And while C++ doesn't provide the rich side-effect analysis that some functional-oriented programming languages perform, const analysis and C++0x lambda syntax can help:

struct foo{
    int x;
    int operator()(int y) const {
        x = 42; // error!  const function can't modify members
    }
};
..
int main(){
    int x;
    auto f = [](int y){ x = 42; }; // error! lambdas don't capture by default.
}

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
@JonathanSterling: No, it's not. It's exactly as wrong as the Greg's one -- currying is called for, not just any partial application. –  Jan Hudec Nov 23 '12 at 13:02
    
Yeah... this is NOT currying. –  Thomas Eding Feb 26 at 4:36

Have a look at Boost.Bind which makes the process shown by Greg more versatile:

transform(a.begin(), a.end(), back_inserter(b), bind(f, _1, 5));

This binds 5 to f's second argument.

It’s worth noting that this is not currying (instead, it’s partial application). However, using currying in a general way is hard in C++ (in fact, it only recently became possible at all) and partial application is often used instead.

share|improve this answer
1  
Konrad, since you are using the single-source form of std::transform, shouldn't you be using _1 instead of _2? The fact that you wrote bind(f, 5, _1) instead of bind(f, _1, 5) says that the variable gets plugged into f as the second argument. –  paxos1977 Sep 30 '08 at 16:31
    
You're right of course. –  Konrad Rudolph Oct 2 '08 at 15:42
4  
I cannot recommend Boost.Bind enough -- learn it, use it, love it!! –  fbrereto Sep 3 '09 at 20:35
    
This is not currying. This is partial application. –  Thomas Eding Feb 26 at 4:39
    
@Thomas You’re absolutely right of course. In fact, I’m super annoyed that the R community uses the wrong terminology fort his. My answer wasn’t actually trying to sell this as currying, but merely showing a better way of implementing the accepted answer. that said, I’ve updated my answer to make this clear. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 26 at 9:15

Other answers nicely explain binders, so I won't repeat that part here. I will only demonstrate how currying and partial application can be done with lambdas in C++0x.

Code example: (Explanation in comments)

#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

using namespace std;

const function<int(int, int)> & simple_add = 
  [](int a, int b) -> int {
    return a + b;
  };

const function<function<int(int)>(int)> & curried_add = 
  [](int a) -> function<int(int)> {
    return [a](int b) -> int {
      return a + b;
    };
  };

int main() {
  // Demonstrating simple_add
  cout << simple_add(4, 5) << endl; // prints 9

  // Demonstrating curried_add
  cout << curried_add(4)(5) << endl; // prints 9

  // Create a partially applied function from curried_add
  const auto & add_4 = curried_add(4);
  cout << add_4(5) << endl; // prints 9
}
share|improve this answer

Currying is a way of reducing a function that takes multiple arguments into a sequence of nested functions with one argument each:

full = (lambda a, b, c: (a + b + c))
print full (1, 2, 3) # print 6

# Curried style
curried = (lambda a: (lambda b: (lambda c: (a + b + c))))
print curried (1)(2)(3) # print 6

Currying is nice because you can define functions that are simply wrappers around other functions with pre-defined values, and then pass around the simplified functions. C++ STL binders provide an implementation of this in C++.

share|improve this answer
    
> C++ STL binders provide an implementation of this in C++. yes, but only for unary and binary functions... –  ugasoft Sep 30 '08 at 8:59
1  
and the broken c++03 (current c++) binders don't work with functions having reference parameters. They simply fail to cope with the reference-to-reference problem. the boost binders are way smarter –  Johannes Schaub - litb Sep 4 '09 at 2:34

1. What is currying?

Currying simply means a transformation of a function of several arguments to a function of a single argument. This is most easily illustrated using an example:

Take a function f that accepts three arguments:

int
f(int a,std::string b,float c)
{
    // do something with a, b, and c
    return 0;
}

If we want to call f, we have to provide all of its arguments f(1,"some string",19.7f).

Then a curried version of f, let's call it curried_f=curry(f) only expects a single argument, that corresponds to the first argument of f, namely the argument a. Additionally, f(1,"some string",19.7f) can also be written using the curried version as curried_f(1)("some string")(19.7f). The return value of curried_f(1) on the other hand is just another function, that handles the next argument of f. In the end, we end up with a function or callable curried_f that fulfills the following equality:

curried_f(first_arg)(second_arg)...(last_arg) == f(first_arg,second_arg,...,last_arg).

2. How can currying be achieved in C++?

The following is a little bit more complicated, but works very well for me (using c++11)... It also allows currying of arbitrary degree like so: auto curried=curry(f)(arg1)(arg2)(arg3) and later auto result=curried(arg4)(arg5). Here it goes:

#include <functional>

namespace _dtl {

    template <typename FUNCTION> struct
    _curry;

    // specialization for functions with a single argument
    template <typename R,typename T> struct
    _curry<std::function<R(T)>> {
        using
        type = std::function<R(T)>;

        const type
        result;

        _curry(type fun) : result(fun) {}

    };

    // recursive specialization for functions with more arguments
    template <typename R,typename T,typename...Ts> struct
    _curry<std::function<R(T,Ts...)>> {
        using
        remaining_type = typename _curry<std::function<R(Ts...)> >::type;

        using
        type = std::function<remaining_type(T)>;

        const type
        result;

        _curry(std::function<R(T,Ts...)> fun)
        : result (
            [=](const T& t) {
                return _curry<std::function<R(Ts...)>>(
                    [=](const Ts&...ts){ 
                        return fun(t, ts...); 
                    }
                ).result;
            }
        ) {}
    };
}

template <typename R,typename...Ts> auto
curry(const std::function<R(Ts...)> fun)
-> typename _dtl::_curry<std::function<R(Ts...)>>::type
{
    return _dtl::_curry<std::function<R(Ts...)>>(fun).result;
}

template <typename R,typename...Ts> auto
curry(R(* const fun)(Ts...))
-> typename _dtl::_curry<std::function<R(Ts...)>>::type
{
    return _dtl::_curry<std::function<R(Ts...)>>(fun).result;
}

#include <iostream>

void 
f(std::string a,std::string b,std::string c)
{
    std::cout << a << b << c;
}

int 
main() {
    curry(f)("Hello ")("functional ")("world!");
    return 0;
}

View output

OK, as Samer commented, I should add some explanations as to how this works. The actual implementation is done in the _dtl::_curry, while the template functions curry are only convenience wrappers. The implementation is recursive over the arguments of the std::function template argument FUNCTION.

For a function with only a single argument, the result is identical to the original function.

        _curry(std::function<R(T,Ts...)> fun)
        : result (
            [=](const T& t) {
                return _curry<std::function<R(Ts...)>>(
                    [=](const Ts&...ts){ 
                        return fun(t, ts...); 
                    }
                ).result;
            }
        ) {}

Here the tricky thing: For a function with more arguments, we return a lambda whose argument is bound to the first argument to the call to fun. Finally, the remaining currying for the remaining N-1 arguments is delegated to the implementation of _curry<Ts...> with one less template argument.

share|improve this answer
    
you need to explain in wording the answer not just post a code, the OP was not just asking for a code, he was asking for explanation! –  Samer Nov 5 '14 at 22:36
1  
+1 This is the first answer that actually provides a solution to "How is currying done in C++?". As pointed out pointed out in the comments of some other answers, general currying (as implemented here) is different from partial application of a finite number of specific arguments. –  Oguk Nov 6 '14 at 21:47
    
check also Luc Danton's answer in Partial application with a C++ lambda? which provides also a nice and maybe somewhat more complete implementation on the subject of partial application. –  Julian Nov 7 '14 at 19:36
    
This is the answer I am looking for: implementing currying with variadic function templates. –  Yongwei Wu Dec 21 '14 at 7:36
2  
Don't use double underscores anywhere in your C++ code (unless you are a compiler vendor). It's simply not legal. –  Thomas Eding Feb 26 at 4:42

These Links are relevant:

The Lambda Calculus page on Wikipedia has a clear example of currying
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lambda_calculus#Motivation

This paper treats currying in C/C++
http://asg.unige.ch/site/papers/Dami91a.pdf

share|improve this answer

If you're using C++14 it's very easy:

template<typename Function, typename... Arguments>
auto curry(Function function, Arguments... args) {
    return [=](auto... rest) {
        return function(args..., rest...);
    }
}

You can then use it like this:

auto add = [](auto x, auto y) { return x + y; }

// curry 4 into add
auto add4 = curry(add, 4);

add4(6); // 10
share|improve this answer
2  
Technically this is partial function evaluation: a full curry would take a 3 argument function f, and allow curry(f)(3)(2)(1) before invoking. +1, because partial function evaluation is still useful (and often what people mean by 'curry'), and because of how tight it is. You can improve performance with much more code and perfect forwarding. –  Yakk Oct 30 '14 at 13:48

I implemented currying with variadic templates as well (see Julian's answer). However, I did not make use of recursion or std::function. Note: It uses a number of C++14 features.

The provided example (main function) actually runs at compile time, proving that the currying method does not trump essential optimizations by the compiler.

The code can be found here: https://gist.github.com/Garciat/c7e4bef299ee5c607948

with this helper file: https://gist.github.com/Garciat/cafe27d04cfdff0e891e

The code still needs (a lot of) work, which I may or may not complete soon. Either way, I'm posting this here for future reference.

Posting code in case links die (though they shouldn't):

#include <type_traits>
#include <tuple>
#include <functional>
#include <iostream>

// ---

template <typename FType>
struct function_traits;

template <typename RType, typename... ArgTypes>
struct function_traits<RType(ArgTypes...)> {
    using arity = std::integral_constant<size_t, sizeof...(ArgTypes)>;

    using result_type = RType;

    template <size_t Index>
    using arg_type = typename std::tuple_element<Index, std::tuple<ArgTypes...>>::type;
};

// ---

namespace details {
    template <typename T>
    struct function_type_impl
      : function_type_impl<decltype(&T::operator())>
    { };

    template <typename RType, typename... ArgTypes>
    struct function_type_impl<RType(ArgTypes...)> {
        using type = RType(ArgTypes...);
    };

    template <typename RType, typename... ArgTypes>
    struct function_type_impl<RType(*)(ArgTypes...)> {
        using type = RType(ArgTypes...);
    };

    template <typename RType, typename... ArgTypes>
    struct function_type_impl<std::function<RType(ArgTypes...)>> {
        using type = RType(ArgTypes...);
    };

    template <typename T, typename RType, typename... ArgTypes>
    struct function_type_impl<RType(T::*)(ArgTypes...)> {
        using type = RType(ArgTypes...);
    };

    template <typename T, typename RType, typename... ArgTypes>
    struct function_type_impl<RType(T::*)(ArgTypes...) const> {
        using type = RType(ArgTypes...);
    };
}

template <typename T>
struct function_type
  : details::function_type_impl<typename std::remove_cv<typename std::remove_reference<T>::type>::type>
{ };

// ---

template <typename Args, typename Params>
struct apply_args;

template <typename HeadArgs, typename... Args, typename HeadParams, typename... Params>
struct apply_args<std::tuple<HeadArgs, Args...>, std::tuple<HeadParams, Params...>>
  : std::enable_if<
        std::is_constructible<HeadParams, HeadArgs>::value,
        apply_args<std::tuple<Args...>, std::tuple<Params...>>
    >::type
{ };

template <typename... Params>
struct apply_args<std::tuple<>, std::tuple<Params...>> {
    using type = std::tuple<Params...>;
};

// ---

template <typename TupleType>
struct is_empty_tuple : std::false_type { };

template <>
struct is_empty_tuple<std::tuple<>> : std::true_type { };

// ----

template <typename FType, typename GivenArgs, typename RestArgs>
struct currying;

template <typename FType, typename... GivenArgs, typename... RestArgs>
struct currying<FType, std::tuple<GivenArgs...>, std::tuple<RestArgs...>> {
    std::tuple<GivenArgs...> given_args;

    FType func;

    template <typename Func, typename... GivenArgsReal>
    constexpr
    currying(Func&& func, GivenArgsReal&&... args) :
      given_args(std::forward<GivenArgsReal>(args)...),
      func(std::move(func))
    { }

    template <typename... Args>
    constexpr
    auto operator() (Args&&... args) const& {
        using ParamsTuple = std::tuple<RestArgs...>;
        using ArgsTuple = std::tuple<Args...>;

        using RestArgsPrime = typename apply_args<ArgsTuple, ParamsTuple>::type;

        using CanExecute = is_empty_tuple<RestArgsPrime>;

        return apply(CanExecute{}, std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(GivenArgs)>{}, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

    template <typename... Args>
    constexpr
    auto operator() (Args&&... args) && {
        using ParamsTuple = std::tuple<RestArgs...>;
        using ArgsTuple = std::tuple<Args...>;

        using RestArgsPrime = typename apply_args<ArgsTuple, ParamsTuple>::type;

        using CanExecute = is_empty_tuple<RestArgsPrime>;

        return std::move(*this).apply(CanExecute{}, std::make_index_sequence<sizeof...(GivenArgs)>{}, std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

private:
    template <typename... Args, size_t... Indices>
    constexpr
    auto apply(std::false_type, std::index_sequence<Indices...>, Args&&... args) const& {
        using ParamsTuple = std::tuple<RestArgs...>;
        using ArgsTuple = std::tuple<Args...>;

        using RestArgsPrime = typename apply_args<ArgsTuple, ParamsTuple>::type;

        using CurryType = currying<FType, std::tuple<GivenArgs..., Args...>, RestArgsPrime>;

        return CurryType{ func, std::get<Indices>(given_args)..., std::forward<Args>(args)... };
    }

    template <typename... Args, size_t... Indices>
    constexpr
    auto apply(std::false_type, std::index_sequence<Indices...>, Args&&... args) && {
        using ParamsTuple = std::tuple<RestArgs...>;
        using ArgsTuple = std::tuple<Args...>;

        using RestArgsPrime = typename apply_args<ArgsTuple, ParamsTuple>::type;

        using CurryType = currying<FType, std::tuple<GivenArgs..., Args...>, RestArgsPrime>;

        return CurryType{ std::move(func), std::get<Indices>(std::move(given_args))..., std::forward<Args>(args)... };
    }

    template <typename... Args, size_t... Indices>
    constexpr
    auto apply(std::true_type, std::index_sequence<Indices...>, Args&&... args) const& {
        return func(std::get<Indices>(given_args)..., std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }

    template <typename... Args, size_t... Indices>
    constexpr
    auto apply(std::true_type, std::index_sequence<Indices...>, Args&&... args) && {
        return func(std::get<Indices>(std::move(given_args))..., std::forward<Args>(args)...);
    }
};

// ---

template <typename FType, size_t... Indices>
constexpr
auto curry(FType&& func, std::index_sequence<Indices...>) {
    using RealFType = typename function_type<FType>::type;
    using FTypeTraits = function_traits<RealFType>;

    using CurryType = currying<FType, std::tuple<>, std::tuple<typename FTypeTraits::template arg_type<Indices>...>>;

    return CurryType{ std::move(func) };
}

template <typename FType>
constexpr
auto curry(FType&& func) {
    using RealFType = typename function_type<FType>::type;
    using FTypeArity = typename function_traits<RealFType>::arity;

    return curry(std::move(func), std::make_index_sequence<FTypeArity::value>{});
}

// ---

int main() {
    auto add = curry([](int a, int b) { return a + b; });

    std::cout << add(5)(10) << std::endl;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.