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As marker interfaces are mostly useful for just marking a class, the same thing can be achievable through annotations. For example Cloneable interface can be @Cloneable.

So is there still need for marker interfaces or can be relpaced by Annotations? Is there any advantage/disadvantage of using any of them? I mean prefer one over other?

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Marker interface was established as an antipattern even before Generics. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 4 '13 at 11:40
    
@MarkoTopolnik previously marker interfaces were needed for metadata, but the same can now be achieved using annotations. That is why it is called an anti-pattern, am I right? –  Narendra Pathai Mar 4 '13 at 11:45
    
Yes, plus even on Java 1.4 there were recommendations to design without marker interfaces. Marker interfaces are an abuse of the concept of polymorphism. –  Marko Topolnik Mar 4 '13 at 12:25
    
possible duplicate of Marker interface or annotations? –  Raedwald Mar 4 '13 at 12:40
    
downvoter care to comment? –  Narendra Pathai Mar 4 '13 at 19:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Marker interfaces are better than annotations when they're used to define a type. For example, Serializable can be used (and should be used) as the type of an argument that must be serializable. An annotation doesn't allow doing that:

public void writeToFile(Serializable object);

If the marker interface doesn't define a type, but only meta-data, then an annotation is better.

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One more thing to mention would be the cost of using annotations. To check if object is an instance of an interface one can use instanceof which is a relatively low-cost operation nowadays. Using annotations requires Java reflection calls and is far more costly.

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