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Let's say I have an interface Foo with method bar(String s). The only thing I want mocked is bar("test");.

I cannot do it with static partial mocking, because I only want the bar method mocked when "test" argument is being passed. I cannot do it with dynamic partial mocking, because this is an interface and I also do not want the implementation constructor mocked. I also cannot use interface mocking with MockUp, because I have no ability to inject mocked instance, it is created somewhere in code.

Is there something I am missing?

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How is Foo created? Sample code would be good. –  mlk Mar 4 '13 at 12:00
    
Is there something I don't understand? Why Foo foo = mock(FooImpl.class); when(foo.bar("test")).thenReturn("mocked"); when(foo.bar(anyString())).thenCallRealMethod() doesn't suit you. Edit: I didn't saw at first that you were using JMockit. –  Alex Mar 4 '13 at 12:01
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Indeed, for this situation you would need to dynamically mock the classes that implement the desired interface. But this combination (@Capturing + dynamic mocking) is not currently supported by JMockit.

That said, if the implementation class is known and accessible to test code, then it can be done with dynamic mocking alone, as the following example test shows:

public interface Foo {
    int getValue();
    String bar(String s);
}

static final class FooImpl implements Foo {
    private final int value;
    FooImpl(int value) { this.value = value; }
    public int getValue() { return value; }
    public String bar(String s) { return s; }
}

@Test
public void dynamicallyMockingAllInstancesOfAClass()
{
    final Foo exampleOfFoo = new FooImpl(0);

    new NonStrictExpectations(FooImpl.class) {{
        exampleOfFoo.bar("test"); result = "aBcc";
    }};

    Foo newFoo = new FooImpl(123);
    assertEquals(123, newFoo.getValue());
    assertEquals("aBcc", newFoo.bar("test")); // mocked
    assertEquals("real one", newFoo.bar("real one")); // not mocked
}
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I was able to achieve it with MockUp + if-else checking of input arguments. Anyway, thanks for your reply! How will this solution behave, if a call to exampleOfFoo.bar("not_test") will down the stack end up with exampleOfFoo.bar("test")? Will the mocked or the original method get called? –  Marcin Mar 4 '13 at 17:55
    
The recorded result, "aBcc", would get returned. (At least if using a recent version of JMockit.) –  Rogério Mar 4 '13 at 19:01
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final Foo foo = new MockUp<Foo>() {
        @Mock
        public bar(String s)(){
        return "test";
        }
    }.getMockInstance();
foo.bar("") will now retun "test"...
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