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I know this seems like a duplicate question, but i was really unable to find a good answer on the related topic.

There are tons of questions about what is the best way to handle an OnClick event of a Button.
Here are some of the options i came across:

1 - Defining a listener programatically on the OnCreate method:

button.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener(){
    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        //do stuff
    }
});

2 - Setting the android:OnClick property on the XML:

<Button android:id="@+id/btnDelete"
    ...
    android:OnClick="btnDelete_OnClick"/>

3 - Implementing the OnClickListener interface on the Activity class and passing a self reference to the Button:

public class MainActivity extends Activity implements OnClickListener{
    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        //do stuff
    }

    protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
        ...
        button.setOnClickListener(this);
    }
}

4 - Create a field with the OnClickListener type:

private OnClickListener onClickHandler = new OnClickListener(){

    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        //stuff
    }
};

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    ...
    button.setOnClickListener(onClickHandler);
}

When it comes to a Button and the OnClick event, I would always prefer defining it on the XML, it is just more clean.

But what about other events like the OnItemClick from the ListView or the OnTimeSet from the TimePickerDialog? There is no property I can see for setting it on the XML. I think that implementing the Listener interface is a pretty clean solution, but that would mean I can only implement it once, and if I have two equal Views I would have to handle their events in the same place. If I use option 2 or 4, it would probably get quite messy when handling several events from different Views from the UI.

I would like to see other opinions on this subject, if there are any other options of implementation for event handling. Is there really an alternative that could be defined as the better one or is it just a personal matter of each programmer?

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closed as not constructive by Geobits, Sam, Alex, Sam I am, Graviton Mar 6 '13 at 3:36

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
To stick with java terminology, n. 4 is not a local variable but a field. Anyway I personally prefer style n. 4 but I don't know if it is the best option for memory. –  vault Mar 4 '13 at 16:02
    
Thanks, updated the question. –  Mt. Schneiders Mar 4 '13 at 16:12
    
It's not a "local field", just a field :D –  vault Mar 4 '13 at 16:44
    
I see, @ vault. Thanks once again then :). –  Mt. Schneiders Mar 4 '13 at 16:49

5 Answers 5

  1. I like this method if I only have one or two of the listener in the class. Such as a listview's onItemClickListener. With multiple views, it does get very messy indeed.

  2. I don't use android:onClick at all, simply because I like to keep my code in my code.

  3. I like this when I have a few views to handle. However, I still like to keep my onClick() code sparse. It typically ends up being a switch by id, with groups of like views calling additional methods to handle, like handleDownVote() or similar. This way, all of my main "handling" calls are done in one place.

  4. I didn't know people did this. I suppose it gives a better ability to group like views than #3, but I never really thought about it. Maybe I'll give it a shot some time.

When it all comes down to it, though, this is a highly subjective question, because there's not really a "right" or "optimized" way to do it. As you can see, every answer so far has been different. No offense, but voting to close.

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Let me try to explain case by case:

Case# 1 This way will create anonymous clases as much as you create buttons (every button will need new listener ), and its less readable and costly.

Case# 2 Actually if you read the code behind this, you will find it use reflection to find your listener (method) of callback, and its less readable, and confuses other developers.

Case# 3 This way is hard to navigate through, because you can't determine the type of the listener you are using with current button (I know eclipse will highlight the methods this are pointing at, but with huge code I think it will be hard to find).

Case# 4 I think this is the best way to implement the listeners,easy to navigate to, more readable, one listener can handle all related events (and with using eclipse, just ctrl+click you can go to the listener), so I recommend this (am using only this way at work)

I hope this will help

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The best way to handle an OnClick event of a Button depends on few things:

1. no of buttons you have.

Ans: if you have only one button you can go with 1st approch of creating annonymoous class. but if you have multiple buttons it is not good to create multiple anonymous onClicklisteners. but to go with other options

2. memmory optimization

Ans: If you are Implementing the OnClickListener interface on the Activity class and passing a self reference to the Button than the onclick listener will keep the reference to that activity object so it will be heavy to keep the whole activity's object in it, so in this way a local variable with the OnClickListener type is more optimized way.

So overall the best practise is the create a local variable with the OnClickListener type is the best way to handle any type of events not only onClick events on Button.

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1  
Thanks for the answer, You said it would be heavy to keep the whole activity's object on the button. Wouldn't it hold on only to a reference to the activity's object? It seems you meant it would load the Activity's object once more on the memory? Just to clarify. –  Mt. Schneiders Mar 4 '13 at 15:42

There is another possibility

class MyListener implements onClickHandler{
    public MyListener(SomeType parameter)
    {
       m_parameter = parameter;
    }
    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        // do some stuff based on the value of m_parameter
    }
    private SomeType m_parameter;
};

protected void onCreate(Bundle savedInstanceState) {
    ...
    findViewById(R.id.Button1).setOnClickListener(new MyListener(parameter1));
    findViewById(R.id.Button2).setOnClickListener(new MyListener(parameter2));
    ...
}

This avoids having to figure out what to do based on the view (button) that was clicked. Obviously you could have more than one parameter to the constructor to support specifying even richer actions without "hard-coding" resource ID's or button identities into the MyListener object.

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Thanks for the answer. I think that creating another class that implements the Listener interface is a pretty valid option, but it seems like it would be more difficult to make this class aware of the context of the activity, for dealing with other views or something like that. –  Mt. Schneiders Mar 4 '13 at 23:34

First - everyone should get used to reading anonymous inner classes. They're gross, but they're widely used and you'll see plenty of them.

That said, I'd opt for #1 because it's localized - you see what you're adding as a listener to the button you're concerned with at the location you're adding it. It allows listening to multiple buttons (vs implementing the listener at the class level).

Style-wise, I recommend that anonymous inner classes with single methods be implemented like this:

button.setOnClickListener(new OnClickListener(){
    @Override
    public void onClick(View v) {
        //do stuff
    }});

The "}});" is a major eyesore - it's intentional. It sticks out like the old "sore thumb". This grabs your eyes and makes you realize something special is happening - the end of the anonymous inner class definition. Anonymous inner classes can be hard to read - this ugliness actually helps the readability.

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