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I'm trying to resolve a known fixed list of Foo services (in singleton scope) using NInject; this resolution happens in a FooProvider's constructor. The problem is that each Foo will need this provider as well.

public interface IFoo { }
public interface IFooProvider { }

public class Foo : IFoo
{
    private readonly IFooProvider _provider;

    public Foo(IFooProvider provider)
    {
        _provider = provider;
    }
}

public class FooProvider : IFooProvider
{
    private List<IFoo> _allFooServices;

    public FooProvider(IKernel kernel)
    {
        _allFooServices = kernel.GetAll<IFoo>().ToList();
    }
}

public class Program
{
    private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var IoC = new StandardKernel();

        IoC.Bind<IFoo>().To<Foo>().InSingletonScope();
        IoC.Bind<IFooProvider>().To<FooProvider>().InSingletonScope();

        var foo = IoC.Get<IFoo>();
    }
}

There is a logical cyclic loop here, and obviously the stack overflow shows its going down it. However, I have both interface bound to singletons.

Thinking about it; we try to resolve IFoo, which then needs resolution of IFooProvider, itself needing a list of IFoo... but we haven't resolved for any IFoo singletons yet because we're still trying to resolve it!

So how could I work around this?

[Edit] Possible solution; delay buffering of IFoo service instances.

public FooProvider(IKernel kernel)
{
    _kernel = kernel;
}

public IFoo Find(object context)
{
    if (_allFooServices == null)
        _allFooServices = _kernel.GetAll<IFoo>().ToList();

    return _allFooServices.Where(...

[Why?]

The general idea is to avoid the service locator pattern, as I've seen it described as an anti-pattern. So, rather than try to resolve services through the dependency injector during run time; you try to get a list of services during setup. The problem with this though, is that if any of your services want to find other services, you have the above problem.

share|improve this question
1  
So why does Foo need an instance of FooProvider? If in fact FooProvider is a factory to create Foo's it should be readily available another way yes? –  Michael Perrenoud Mar 4 '13 at 12:43
    
All Foo are services, the FooProvider is trying to get a (resolved) list of all Foo services at injection time. If any foo needs to find another foo (specific to context) during run-time it can ask the FooProvider at run time. –  Meirion Hughes Mar 4 '13 at 13:05
    
So shouldn't FooProvider be a singleton that's easily resolved via dependency injection by all other Foo's? –  Michael Perrenoud Mar 4 '13 at 13:11
    
They are bound as singleton. –  Meirion Hughes Mar 4 '13 at 13:14
    
Then if FooProvider is already bound as a singleton, if you need one as a Foo just recover it using dependency injection. It really should be that simple. –  Michael Perrenoud Mar 4 '13 at 13:35

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You cannot resolve this cyclic dependency with Ninject. You are not even able to create such object graph by hand.

First you have to remove the cyclic dependency from at least one constructor. You can move this dependency to property and use property injection.

public class Foo : IFoo
{
   [Inject]
   public IFooProvider Provider { get; set; }
}

If you want to avoid service-locator pattern you should remove dependency on IKernel from the constructor of FooProvider and use the injection of collection of registered IFoo implementations instead.

public class FooProvider : IFooProvider
{
    private List<IFoo> _allFooServices;

    public FooProvider(IEnumerable<IFoo> fooServices)
    {
        _allFooServices = fooServices.ToList();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You could use property injection with one of them.

public interface IFoo
{
}

public interface IFooProvider
{
}

public class Foo : IFoo
{
   [Inject]
   public IFooProvider Provider { get; set; }
}

public class FooProvider : IFooProvider
{
   private List<IFoo> _allFooServices;

   public FooProvider(IKernel kernel)
   {
      _allFooServices = kernel.GetAll<IFoo>().ToList();
   }
}

private static void Main(string[] args)
{
   var IoC = new StandardKernel();
   IoC.Bind<IFoo>().To<Foo>().InSingletonScope();
   IoC.Bind<IFooProvider>().To<FooProvider>().InSingletonScope();

   var foo = IoC.Get<IFoo>();
 }
share|improve this answer

Really this seems like bad design, but to answer your question directly, don't instantiate _allFooServices in the constructor. You can do something like this:

private List<IFoo> _allFooServices;
private List<IFoo> AllFooServices
{
    get { return _allFooServices ?? (_allFooServices = Kernel.GetAll<IFoo>().ToList()) }
}

Perhaps you can choose a more concrete example, rather than Foo.

share|improve this answer
    
The general idea is to avoid the service locator pattern, as I've seen it described as an anti-pattern. So, rather than try to resolve services through the dependency injector during run time; you try to get a list of services during setup. The problem with this though, is that if any of your services want to find other services, you have the above problem. –  Meirion Hughes Mar 4 '13 at 13:31
    
I'm not sure what you're getting at here - your code still uses the service locator pattern, it just happens to use the pattern from within a constructor. It doesn't avoid the problems with service locator - in fact, as you found it, it creates even more problems. –  cbp Mar 5 '13 at 1:30

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