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I need a function which takes a calculated value (can range from very small to very large) and rounds it to a number of decimal places for display. The number of decimal places should depend on the magnitude of the input and so I can't just use something like .toFixed(n) because n is unknown.

I came up with the following, but have the feeling there's a much better way of doing this:

function format_output(output) {
    if (output > 10000) {
        output = output.toFixed(0);
} else {
        if (output > 100 && output < 10000) {
        output = output.toFixed(1);
    } else {
            if (output>1 && output <100) {
                output = output.toFixed(3);
    } else {
        // repeat as necessary
    }
return output;
}

Thanks!

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

For your requirement you should look into scientific notation

output.toExponential(); 

If you dont want to use scientific notation try this instead:

 function format_output(output) {
         var n =  Math.log(output) / Math.LN10;
         var x = 4-n;
        if(x<0)
           x=0;
        output = output.toFixed(x);
    return output;
    }
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That doesn't sound as though it would help at all for the sort of requirement the user if presenting, presumably presenting data with a reasonable degree of precision. –  Scott Sauyet Mar 4 '13 at 12:50
    
Thanks, but the output is intended for "non-technical" people - I'm looking for something that will display numbers like 0.0023, 1.63, 100.4 and 10,000 –  James Mar 4 '13 at 12:52
    
in that case can you not take log of the number and then use that with .toFixed –  Techmonk Mar 4 '13 at 12:56
    
I added the other solution –  Techmonk Mar 4 '13 at 12:58
    
Just watch the boundary conditions. This throws an exception when passed 0. –  Scott Sauyet Mar 4 '13 at 13:26
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It seems you want to limit the value to 5 significant digits. The following does it for a limited range of values (99999 to 0.00001), you can work out how to do it for the rest. Note that there may be rounding errors in some old browsers for some values.

  <input onchange="
    var bits = this.value.split('.');
    var places = 5 - bits[0].length;

    if (places < 0) {
      places = 0;

    } else if (bits[0] == 0) {
      places = 5;
    }
    this.value = Number(this.value).toFixed(places); 
  ">
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It does seem that you want to limit this to about five places of precision. This might do so more explicitly:

var toPrecision = function(precision) {
    return function(nbr) {
        if (typeof nbr !== 'number') return 0; //???
        if (nbr === 0) return 0;
        var abs = Math.abs(nbr);
        var sign = nbr / abs;
        nbr = abs;
        var digits = Math.ceil(Math.log(nbr)/Math.LN10);
        var factor = Math.pow(10, precision - digits);
        var result = nbr * factor;
        result = Math.round(result, 0);
        return result / factor;
    };
};

var format_output = toPrecision(5);

format_output(1234567.89012); // 1234600
format_output(987.654321); // 987.65
format_output(-.00246813579); // -0.0024681

Of course you can combine those into a two-argument function if you prefer:

var toPrecision = function(nbr, precision) {
    if (typeof nbr !== 'number') return 0; //???
    if (nbr === 0) return 0;
    var abs = Math.abs(nbr);
    var sign = nbr / abs;
    nbr = abs;
    var digits = Math.ceil(Math.log(nbr)/Math.LN10);
    var factor = Math.pow(10, precision - digits);
    var result = nbr * factor;
    result = Math.round(result, 0);
    return result / factor;
};

toPrecision(1234567.89012, 5); // 1234600

Or, if that floats your boat, you could attach it to the Math object:

Math.toPrecision = function(nbr, precision) {
    // ...
} 
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