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As a lazy developer, I like to use this trick to specify a default function:

template <class Type, unsigned int Size, class Function = std::less<Type> >
void arrange(std::array<Type, Size> &x, Function&& f = Function())
{
    std::sort(std::begin(x), std::end(x), f);
}

But I have a problem in a very particular case, which is the following:

template <class Type, unsigned int Size, class Function = /*SOMETHING 1*/>
void index(std::array<Type, Size> &x, Function&& f = /*SOMETHING 2*/)
{
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < Size; ++i) {
        x[i] = f(i);
    }
}

In this case, I would like the default function to be the equivalent of: [](const unsigned int i){return i;} (a function that just returns the passed value).

In order to do that, what do I have to write instead of /*SOMETHING 1*/ and /*SOMETHING 2*/?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There is no standard functor that does this, but it is easy enough to write (though the exact form is up for some dispute):

struct identity {
    template<typename U>
    constexpr auto operator()(U&& v) const noexcept
        -> decltype(std::forward<U>(v))
    {
        return std::forward<U>(v);
    }
};

This can be used as follows:

template <class Type, std::size_t Size, class Function = identity>
void index(std::array<Type, Size> &x, Function&& f = Function())
{
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < Size; ++i) {
        x[i] = f(i);
    }
}
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3  
+1, but rather Function() than identity() as default argument. –  Christian Rau Mar 4 '13 at 17:13
    
@ChristianRau: Good point. –  Mankarse Mar 5 '13 at 1:03
    
Why do you use a struct here? Why not just define identity as a function in and of itself? –  Claudiu Nov 14 '14 at 21:33
    
@Claudiu: A struct can be passed as an object into metafunctions (meaning that the type deduction for the template paramenters can take place, and also meaning that inlining is easier for the compiler). A bare function would have to be passed as a function pointer. To transform a function template into a function pointer, the template would have to be manually instantiated (with a perhaps unknown type argument). –  Mankarse Nov 15 '14 at 11:56

boost::phoenix offers a complete functional toolbox, here 'arg1' is the ident to identity ;-)

#include <boost/phoenix/core.hpp>

template <class X, class Function = decltype(boost::phoenix::arg_names::arg1)>
void index(X &x, Function f = Function()) {
    for (std::size_t i = 0; i < x.size(); ++i) {
            x[i] = f(i);
  }
}
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This is called the identity function. Unfortunately, it is not part of the C++ standard, but you can easily build one yourself.

If you happen to use g++, you can activate its extensions with -std=gnu++11 and then

#include <array>
#include <ext/functional>

template <class Type, std::size_t Size, class Function = __gnu_cxx::identity<Type> >
void index(std::array<Type, Size> &x, Function&& f = __gnu_cxx::identity<Type>())
{
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < Size; ++i) {
        x[i] = f(i);
    }
}
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Here, too, the default argument should probably Function() (to allow this to work even when Function is not __gnu_cxx::identity<Type>). –  jogojapan Mar 5 '13 at 1:30

You can just build your own identity functor:

template <typename T>
class returnIdentifyFunctor
{
  public:
     auto operator ()(  T &&i ) -> decltype( std::forward<T>(i) )
    {
      return std::move(i);
    }
};

template <class Type, unsigned int Size, class Function = returnIdentifyFunctor<Type>>
void index(std::array<Type, Size> &x, Function&& f = Function() )
 {
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < Size; ++i) {
            x[i] = f(i);
  }
}
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2  
Fail for move-only types. –  Puppy Mar 4 '13 at 13:24
    
@DeadMG Thank you, good comment, I edited my answer with what I think is the minimum needed, can you let me know if that fixes all the issues. Should I use forward instead of move? –  Shafik Yaghmour Mar 4 '13 at 13:54

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