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So I have the following pseudo Javascript code:

var Class = (function(window, document, $) {
    function meth_1()
    {
        //some code
    }

    function meth_2()
    {
        //some code
    }

    function meth_3()
    {
        //some code
    }

    function meth_4()
    {
        //some code to call other three functions dynamically
    }

    Class = {
        meth_1: meth_1,
        meth_2: meth_2,
        meth_3: meth_3,
        meth_4: meth_4
    };
    return Class;

})(window, document, jQuery);

In the meth_4 function, I want to call the other 3 functions dynamically by passing the function name as a string. How can I do this?!

In this related StackOverflow question, the answer provides a solution to how this could be done in window scope i.e. window[function_name](). However, I'd like to know how I can do it in my particular circumstance.

Thanks.

EDIT

The answer I selected works ok. You could also do the following:

var Class = (function(window, document, $) {
    var meth_func = {
        meth_1: function(){/**your code**/},
        meth_2: function(){/**your code**/},
        meth_3: function(){/**your code**/}            
    }

    function meth_4(func_name)
    {
        meth_func[func_name]();
    }

    Class = {
        meth_4: meth_4
    };
    return Class;

})(window, document, jQuery);

This would probably work better if you wanted to make private those three functions being called dynamically.

share|improve this question
1  
Why don't you just create an array of functions? –  Lee Taylor Mar 4 '13 at 13:43
1  
@LeeTaylor How?! Can you post an answer on that?! –  Obinwanne Hill Mar 4 '13 at 13:49
    
to make it clear, you are looking for an Execute function, so that meth4 body could be : Execute("Class.meth_1"); Execute("class.meth_2");... ? –  jbl Mar 4 '13 at 13:53
    
@jbl I'm not sure I understand you. I want to call the first three functions in a dynamic way from the fourth using only the function name. Just like I can use window[function_name]() is there an alternative for when I want to do the same thing within meth_4. –  Obinwanne Hill Mar 4 '13 at 14:12

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Since you want to call functions using bracket notation in object scope, not window scope, you can use this instead of window:

function meth_4()
{
    this["meth_1"]();
    this["meth_2"]();
    this["meth_3"]();
}
share|improve this answer
    
@FrédéricHamidi Thanks for this. However, this won't work for what I'm trying to do because I'm trying to call the other 3 functions for use within this function i.e. meth_4, and not when I call Class.meth_4();. The earlier deleted comment by @Quentin is actually right. –  Obinwanne Hill Mar 4 '13 at 14:03
1  
@Chuck, using this should still work in this situation, unless you're explicitly decoupling the method from its object before calling it (e.g. with var meth_4 = Class.meth_4; meth_4(); or through call(), apply() or bind()). Is this the case? –  Frédéric Hamidi Mar 4 '13 at 14:07
    
@FrédéricHamidi I need the values returned from meth_1, meth_2, and meth_3 for usage inside meth_4...I hope that makes it clearer?! –  Obinwanne Hill Mar 4 '13 at 14:17
1  
@Chuck, not really :) Values returned from meth_1(), meth_2() and meth_3() can be used by meth_4() since it is their caller. You only have to write something like var meth_1_result = this["meth_1"](); then use that variable within meth_4(). –  Frédéric Hamidi Mar 4 '13 at 14:22
    
For example, I need to do something like var func_name = "meth_1"; var res_meth_1 = this[func_name](); –  Obinwanne Hill Mar 4 '13 at 14:23

I don't know why you would want that (also 'Class' is not good as a variable name), but could be done like this:

var Class = (function (window /*, ... */) {
  return {
    func1: function () {console.log('1')}
  , func2: function () {console.log('2')}
  , func3: function () {console.log('3')}
  , func4: function (funcName) {
      console.log('4+')
      this[funcName]()
    }
  }
})(window)

Class.func4('func3')
share|improve this answer

Here's an implementation that can do what you want. If you pass a string it will simply look up the appropriate function and execute it. However since functions in JS are indeeed objects them self you can pass those around and to show that I've extended the functionality a bit compared to what you ask for. If you pass a function (actual anything but a string) it will (try to) invoke it

meth_4 = function(fun){
   if(typeof fun === 'string'){
       this[fun](args.slice(1));
   } else { //assuming it's a function
       if(arguments.length == 1)
          fun.call(this,[])
       } else {
          fun.apply(this,arguments.slice(1))  
       }
   }
}

JavaScript objects are, or at can be treated as, a key/value pair collection. Any function or property can be access in two semantically equivalent ways

obj.key or obj["key"] in certain cases only the latter can be used. E.g. if the property is called property nameyou can't do obj.property name but can do obj["property name"]

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