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In Java: What is the difference between:

Object o1= ....
o1.getClass().getSimpleName();
o1.getClass().getName();
o1.getClass().getCanonicalName();

?

UPDATE

I have already checked the Javadoc multiple times and yet this never explains it well. I also run a test and that didn't reflect any real meaning behind the way these methods are called.

So please, instead of blaming me for asking this question and directing me to javadoc, try to give some efforts to explain the real meaning behind them. Thanks for your support.

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1  
60  
I think this is a reasonable question. The javadoc doesn't do a good job of explaining the difference between the three. –  Graham Borland Mar 4 '13 at 13:50
    
See - docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/Class.html or maybe just write a test. –  Nick Holt Mar 4 '13 at 13:50
1  
@GrahamBorland The javadoc says "as defined by the Java Language Specification" - so you can look it up in that document. Just because it is not a clickable link people can still do a minimal effort and click on the first search engine result. –  vbence Jun 5 at 16:14
1  
@vbence: Most people would rather get things done than look up the JLS for trivial things like this. Hence, this is the first Google result :) –  wrick Nov 19 at 11:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 233 down vote accepted

If you're unsure about something, try writing a test first.

I did this:

//primitive
System.out.println(int.class.getName());
System.out.println(int.class.getCanonicalName());
System.out.println(int.class.getSimpleName());

System.out.println();

//class
System.out.println(String.class.getName());
System.out.println(String.class.getCanonicalName());
System.out.println(String.class.getSimpleName());

System.out.println();

//inner class
System.out.println(HashMap.SimpleEntry.class.getName());
System.out.println(HashMap.SimpleEntry.class.getCanonicalName());
System.out.println(HashMap.SimpleEntry.class.getSimpleName());        

System.out.println();

//anonymous inner class
System.out.println(new Serializable(){}.getClass().getName());
System.out.println(new Serializable(){}.getClass().getCanonicalName());
System.out.println(new Serializable(){}.getClass().getSimpleName());

Prints:

int
int
int

java.lang.String
java.lang.String
String

java.util.AbstractMap$SimpleEntry
java.util.AbstractMap.SimpleEntry
SimpleEntry

ClassnameTest$1
null

There's an empty line in the last block where getSimpleName returns an empty string.

The upshot looking at this is:

  • the name is the name that you'd use to dynamically load the class with, for example, a call to Class.forName with the default classloader.
  • the canonical name is the name that would be used in an import statement and uniquely identifies the class. Might be useful during toString or logging operations.
  • the simple name loosely identifies the class, again might be useful during toString or logging operations but is not guaranteed to be unique.
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3  
What extra do you think is needed? –  Nick Holt Mar 4 '13 at 17:55
49  
I came here looking for somebody who wrote this program so I wouldn't have to. Thank you Nick! –  Ryan Shillington May 20 '13 at 17:43
    
so canoncial names are ambiguous? e.g. you could have a package java.util.AbstractMap with a non-inner class SimpleEntry and that would have the same canonical name as above? –  Jayen Jul 7 at 7:13
    
@Jayen In practice I have never seen a package named like java.util.AbstractMap. Each value after "." starts with lower case letter. The above package would always be defined as java.util.abstractMap. Meanwhile class name would always be AbstractMap –  Anupam Saini Jul 23 at 10:37
    
@AnupamSaini yes. Having such a package name in a real application would be crazy. –  Jayen Jul 23 at 10:58

Adding arrays:

    //primitive
    System.out.println(int.class.getName());
    System.out.println(int.class.getCanonicalName());
    System.out.println(int.class.getSimpleName());

    System.out.println();

    //class
    System.out.println(String.class.getName());
    System.out.println(String.class.getCanonicalName());
    System.out.println(String.class.getSimpleName());

    System.out.println();

    //inner class
    System.out.println(HashMap.SimpleEntry.class.getName());
    System.out.println(HashMap.SimpleEntry.class.getCanonicalName());
    System.out.println(HashMap.SimpleEntry.class.getSimpleName());        

    System.out.println();

    //anonymous inner class
    System.out.println(new Serializable(){}.getClass().getName());
    System.out.println(new Serializable(){}.getClass().getCanonicalName());
    System.out.println(new Serializable(){}.getClass().getSimpleName());

    System.out.println();

    {
    //primitive Array
    int demo[] = new int[5];
    Class<? extends int[]> clzz = demo.getClass();
    System.out.println(clzz.getName());
    System.out.println(clzz.getCanonicalName());
    System.out.println(clzz.getSimpleName());
    }

    System.out.println();

    {
    //Object Array
    Integer demo[] = new Integer[5]; 
    Class<? extends Integer[]> clzz = demo.getClass();
    System.out.println(clzz.getName());
    System.out.println(clzz.getCanonicalName());
    System.out.println(clzz.getSimpleName());
    }

adds

[I
int[]
int[]

[Ljava.lang.Integer;
java.lang.Integer[]
Integer[]
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