Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

so, i have all the search algorithms, and i am sending random 20000 numbers to each algorithm, trying to figure out how long each will take.

        public void functionsForSorts(int[] array)
    {
        Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();
        long elapsedTime = sw.ElapsedTicks;

        if (array.Length == 20000) 
        {
            sw.Start();
            BubbleSort.Bubble(array);
            sw.Stop();
            elapsedTime = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            label1.Text += "\t" + elapsedTime.ToString() + " miliseconds ";
            Application.DoEvents();

            sw.Restart();
            SelectionSort.Selection(array);
            sw.Stop();
            elapsedTime = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            label2.Text += "\t" + elapsedTime.ToString() + " miliseconds ";
            Application.DoEvents();

            sw.Restart();
            InsertionSort.Insertion(array);
            sw.Stop();
            elapsedTime = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            label3.Text += "\t" + elapsedTime.ToString() + " miliseconds ";
            Application.DoEvents();

            sw.Restart();
            MergeSort.mergeSort(array, 0, array.Length - 1);
            sw.Stop();
            elapsedTime = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            label4.Text += "\t" + elapsedTime.ToString() + " miliseconds ";
            Application.DoEvents();

            sw.Restart();
            ShellSort.Shell(array);
            sw.Stop();
            elapsedTime = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            label5.Text += "\t" + elapsedTime.ToString() + " miliseconds ";
            Application.DoEvents();

            sw.Restart();
            QuickSort.Quicksort(array, 0, array.Length - 1);
            sw.Stop();
            elapsedTime = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;
            label6.Text += "\t" + elapsedTime.ToString() + " miliseconds ";
            Application.DoEvents();
        }

the problem is stopwatch won't give proper results, it works ok for bubble sort, selection sort and merge sort, but i don't know why, it always writes 0 for insertionsort, even though it has a proper value while debugging.and it doesnt give proper values for shell sort and quick sort too.

Another awkward part about this, when i comment out bubble and selection sort, Insertion will give proper results, this is true for all the algorithms, if i make them the 1st one in order, im getting proper results, i showed this to my friends, they don't have any clue either, this really doesn't make sense at all...

share|improve this question
1  
Can you show us the whole code? – Dave Bish Mar 4 '13 at 14:04
    
Can you try the test with some other random operation like label1.Tag = sw.ElapsedMillilseconds.ToString() in place of i5k.Insertion(array) just to see if the sort operation has anything to do with it -- to see if you get 0 on any operation done in that position? – BlueMonkMN Mar 4 '13 at 14:05
    
Actually, if you're only looking at milliseconds instead of ticks, you'll have to use a longer operation like System.Threading.Thread.sleep(1000). – BlueMonkMN Mar 4 '13 at 14:14
1  
FYI, Stopwatch is part of .NET, not part of C# – John Saunders Mar 4 '13 at 14:33
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If the array is already sorted, it's possible your insertion sort had nothing to do and finished in less than 1 millisecond. That could be possible if your previous sort left the array sorted.

(Edit - I apparently have a really hard time typing the word "possible" instead of "possibly"... corrected.)

share|improve this answer
    
Good catch; for me a 40k int sort takes 3 ms from scrambled data, but from that now-sorted state: 0ms the nest time – Marc Gravell Mar 4 '13 at 14:23
    
@MarcGravell Are you copying insertion sort code from random online resources, or did you already have one, or are you using the built-in .NET quicksort (which actually goes slower on sorted data, so I doubt it), or did you just manually implement your own insertion sort already? – BlueMonkMN Mar 4 '13 at 14:27
    
for the purposes of a quick test, I'm just using Array.Sort - not the same thing, but just after theoretical limits here – Marc Gravell Mar 4 '13 at 14:29
    
@MarcGravell Oh, I guess Array.Sort does run faster on already-sorted data. I thought it was a quicksort, and that quicksort did not run faster on already-sorted data, and that my test had provided evidence of that. But then I realized I was re-shuffling my data each time through my loop, and when I stopped doing that, my time did go down to 0 milliseconds on already-sorted data just like yours. My memory of quicksort behavior on already-sorted data must be faulty because MSDN does say that Array.Sort is a quicksort. – BlueMonkMN Mar 4 '13 at 14:33
    
Hm. Quick-sort does supposedly have a worst-case on already-sorted data, but .NET framework must be using somt tricks described in stackoverflow.com/questions/2415193/… to avoid easily exposed worst-case scenarios. – BlueMonkMN Mar 4 '13 at 14:45

which is not possible

what makes you conclude that it is not possible? keep in mind that even Stopwatch has limited precision. 0 doesn't mean "it took no time at all"; it can mean "it didn't take enough time to register with the precision available". To get a sensible timing on something that is fast, you often need to execute it multiple times (meaning: thousands or even millions of times) in a loop inside the timed region. Without seeing what Insertion does, for all we know this is fine.

Personally, I'd use:

sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
// probably loop here!!
i5k.Insertion(array);
sw.Stop();
share|improve this answer
    
read carefully, it gives proper result, when i run just the insertion sort code, it messes up when i run the whole code, i'm not just sending 5000 numbers, im sending 10000, 20000 and 40000 too, is it possible for insertion sort to sort all of these numbers in 0 miliseconds? – imdrunkisuppose Mar 4 '13 at 14:10
1  
@imdrunkisuppose how can I answer that without seeing your insertion code? But yes: computers are fast. Really fast. – Marc Gravell Mar 4 '13 at 14:20
    
@imdrunkisuppose my local machine can sort an array of 40k ints in 3ms. If you have a beefy box, 0ms is not unreasonable. – Marc Gravell Mar 4 '13 at 14:22
    
well since insertion searchs' main logic is the same, and it is not that fast, btw my random numbers can be 4 times as high as arrays length, and since i said the code gives proper result when i just comment out other functions and just send that one, it shows proper result, even for 5k. – imdrunkisuppose Mar 4 '13 at 14:30
    
Are you resetting the array in between each run, as per BlueMonkMN's answer? – jszigeti Mar 4 '13 at 14:45
 elapsedTime = sw.ElapsedMilliseconds;

A millisecond is a very long time, a modern processor can execute millions of instructions in a msec. Enough to get your insertion sort done in less than one msec so ElapsedMilliseconds returns 0. Avoid throwing away the resolution you get out of Stopwatch, use its Elapsed property instead.

share|improve this answer

Don't use Stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds, which will return 0 if the operation took less than 1 millisecond.

Use Stopwatch.ElapsedTicks instead. And also do what Marc said above.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.