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A representation of my table:

CREATE TABLE Sales 
    (
     id int identity primary key, 
     SaleAmount numeric(10,2)
    );

DECLARE @i INT;
SELECT @i = 1;
SET NOCOUNT ON
WHILE @i <= 100
BEGIN
    INSERT INTO Sales VALUES (ABS(CHECKSUM(NEWID()))/10000000.0 );
    SELECT @i = @i + 1;
END;
SET NOCOUNT OFF

I need to order my table Sales by SaleAmount and then select all records where a running total of SaleAmount is no greater than X.

To do this I'm currently using a temporary table to first sort the records and then selecting records where the running total is less than or equal to X (in this example 10).

CREATE TABLE #TEMP_TABLE 
    (
      ID integer IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY, 
      SaleAmount numeric(10,2)
    );

INSERT INTO #TEMP_TABLE 
(SaleAmount)
SELECT SaleAmount FROM Sales
ORDER BY SaleAmount

SELECT * FROM
  (SELECT
      Id,
      SaleAmount,
      (SaleAmount+COALESCE((SELECT SUM(SaleAmount)
          FROM #TEMP_TABLE b
          WHERE b.Id < a.Id),0))
          AS RunningTotal
    FROM #TEMP_TABLE a) InnerTable
WHERE RunningTotal <= 10

Is there a way in which I can first order my Sales table without the use of a temporary table?

share|improve this question
1  
My best advice for running totals: just use a cursor. The sub-select approaches are exponentially bad as the row count goes up. This post has a lot more details: sqlperformance.com/2012/07/t-sql-queries/running-totals –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 4 '13 at 15:22
    
@AaronBertrand Thanks for the link; made for interesting reading. If If not a cursor approach then at least an inner join would be an improvement. –  DMK Mar 4 '13 at 15:50
    
an INNER JOIN will suffer from the same exponential read problem, no? –  Aaron Bertrand Mar 4 '13 at 16:05
    
@AaronBertrand Yes your right, my point was an inner join requires fewer reads compared to the sub query which I am currently using. –  DMK Mar 4 '13 at 16:11

5 Answers 5

If you are using SQL Server 2012, then you can just use the window function for cumulative sum:

select s.*,
       sum(SaleAmount) over (order by id) as RunningTotal
from Sales s

This is equivalent to the following correlated subquery:

select s.*,
       (select sum(SalesAmount) from sales s2 where s2.id <= s.id) as RunningTotal
from Sales s
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, my fault. I forgot to add the tag SQL-Server 2005. –  DMK Mar 4 '13 at 14:38
2  
This is exactly the sort of thing I require; If only I could persuade all our clients to update to SQL Server 2012 :) –  DMK Mar 4 '13 at 14:51
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Following Aaron Bertrand's suggestion of using a cursor method :

DECLARE @st TABLE
(
    Id       Int PRIMARY KEY,
    SaleAmount  Numeric(10,2),
    RunningTotal Numeric(10,2)
);

DECLARE
    @Id         INT,
    @SaleAmount  Numeric(10,2),
    @RunningTotal Numeric(10,2) = 0;

DECLARE c CURSOR
    LOCAL STATIC FORWARD_ONLY READ_ONLY
    FOR
    SELECT id, SaleAmount
      FROM Sales
      ORDER BY SaleAmount;

OPEN c;

FETCH NEXT FROM c INTO @Id, @SaleAmount;

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN
    SET @RunningTotal = @RunningTotal + @SaleAmount;

    INSERT @st(Id, SaleAmount,  RunningTotal)
        SELECT @Id, @SaleAmount, @RunningTotal;

    FETCH NEXT FROM c INTO @Id, @SaleAmount;
END

CLOSE c;
DEALLOCATE c;

SELECT Id, SaleAmount, RunningTotal
    FROM @st
    WHERE RunningTotal<=10
    ORDER BY SaleAmount;

This is an increase in code and still requires a table variable. However the improvement in performance is significant.

Credit has to go to Aaron Bertrand for the excellent article on running totals he wrote.

share|improve this answer
    
I've select this answer as the correct answer it is compatible with Sql Server 2005. However if backward compatibility was not a factor I would go for Gordon Linoffs answer. –  DMK Mar 7 '13 at 14:11

One more option with CTE, ROW_NUMBER() ranking function and APPLY() operator

  ;WITH cte AS
   (
    SELECT ROW_NUMBER() OVER(ORDER BY SaleAmount) AS rn, SaleAmount
    FROM Sales s  
    )
    SELECT *
    FROM cte c CROSS APPLY (
                            SELECT SUM(s2.SaleAmount) AS RunningTotal
                            FROM Sales s2
                            WHERE c.SaleAmount >= s2.SaleAmount
                            ) o
    WHERE o.RunningTotal <= 10     

FYI, for avoiding operation of sorting you can use this index:

CREATE INDEX ix_SaleAmount_Sales ON Sales(SaleAmount)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

After some research, i believe that what your aiming is not possible, unless using SS2012, or Oracle.

Since your solution seems to work i would advise using a table variable instead of a schema table:

DECLARE @TEMP_TABLE TABLE (
    ID integer IDENTITY PRIMARY KEY,
    SaleAmount numeric(10,2) 
);

INSERT INTO @TEMP_TABLE 
(SaleAmount)
SELECT SaleAmount FROM Sales
ORDER BY SaleAmount

SELECT * FROM
  (SELECT
      Id,
      SaleAmount,
      (SaleAmount+COALESCE((SELECT SUM(SaleAmount)
          FROM @TEMP_TABLE b
          WHERE b.Id < a.Id),0))
          AS RunningTotal
    FROM @TEMP_TABLE a) InnerTable
WHERE RunningTotal <= 10

When testing side-by-side, i found some performance improvements.

share|improve this answer
1  
I agree the Over clause in SQL server is limited compared to Oracle; unless your using Sql server 2012. I was using a Temporary table rather than a Table variable as the Sales table could potentially be a million record table and Table variables don't support Parallelism which I believe could slow the query down considerably when dealing with such a large number of records. –  DMK Mar 4 '13 at 15:07
    
indeed when dealing with a large amount of records temp table is advice (sqlserverplanet.com/tsql/…) in this article 1000 is considered the threshold value. –  RMiranda Mar 4 '13 at 15:16

First of all, you are doing a sub-select and then doing a select * from the sub-select. This is unnecessary.

SELECT
  Id,
  SaleAmount,
  (SaleAmount+COALESCE((SELECT SUM(SaleAmount)
      FROM #TEMP_TABLE b
      WHERE b.Id < a.Id),0))
      AS RunningTotal
FROM #TEMP_TABLE
WHERE RunningTotal <= 10

Now, the temp table is just a query on the Sales table. There is no purpose to ordering the temporary table because by the rules of SQL, the order in the temporary table does not have to be honored, only the order by clause on the outer query, so

SELECT
  Id,
  SaleAmount,
  (SaleAmount+COALESCE((SELECT SUM(SaleAmount)
      FROM Sales b
      WHERE b.Id < a.Id),0))
      AS RunningTotal
FROM Sales
WHERE RunningTotal <= 10
share|improve this answer
    
The reason for the sub_select was to remove the error : Invalid column name 'RunningTotal'. –  DMK Mar 4 '13 at 14:35
1  
If I try to use your second example which I'd previously tried myself it returns The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived tables, subqueries, and common table expressions, unless TOP or FOR XML is also specified. –  DMK Mar 4 '13 at 14:36
    
OK, let's remove it. I am unfamiliar with COALESCE and don't know if order matters there, but I don't think it will. –  Marlin Pierce Mar 4 '13 at 15:27

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