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I have this class

Class.V = function(v) {
    if (v.BooleanValue == true) {
        v.Success();
    } else {
        v.Fail();
    }

    return Class;
}

And i have a button which will execute a function that will returns true or false to procede or not with the form.

<input type="submit" onclick="return check()" Value="Check" />


function check() {
    Class.V({
        BooleanValue: true,
        Success: function() {
            return true;
        },
        Fail: function() {
            return false;
        }
    })

But it doest work. This work instead:

function check() {
    Class.V({
        o: true,
        Success: function() {
            results = true;
        },
        Fail: function() {
            results = false;
        }
        return results;
        //now works as expected
        })

Why this happen?

share|improve this question
    
This is a bit tangential, but I recommend javascript.crockford.com –  Aaron Kurtzhals Mar 4 '13 at 14:38

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

According to your current code, you have to propagate the return values of your inner functions from your outer function:

Class.V = function(v)
{
    if (v.BooleanValue) {
        return v.Success();
    } else {
        return v.Fail();
    }

    return Class;
}
share|improve this answer
    
voted up cuz for such a good clear and direct description and example –  Misters Mar 4 '13 at 15:38

You need to further return the values that the v.Success and v.Fail functions return to Class.V:

if (v.BooleanValue) {
    return v.Success();
    // ^ return here
} else {
    return v.Fail();
    // ^ and here
}
share|improve this answer

You would need to return the value of your methods:

Class.V = function(v)
{
if(v.BooleanValue==true)
{
   return v.Success();
}
else{
   return v.Fail();
}
}
share|improve this answer

return only affects the current function call, not the chain. In the case of your first block of code, return true; only returns from the anonymous callback. You have to pass it along. Something like this:

Class.V = function(v) {
    return v.BooleanValue ? v.Success() : return v.Fail();
}

function check() {
    return Class.V({
      BooleanValue: true,
      Success:function() {
          return true;
      },
      Fail:function() {
          return false;
      }
    })
}
share|improve this answer
1  
do you need the return on return v.Fail(); if you're using it in a tertiary like that? –  jbabey Mar 4 '13 at 14:39
    
Nope, the return applies to the whole ?: piece. –  Niet the Dark Absol Mar 4 '13 at 14:42

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