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What is the best way to iterate through a strongly-typed generic List in C#.NET and VB.NET?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 27 down vote accepted

For C#:

foreach(ObjectType objectItem in objectTypeList)
{
    // ...do some stuff
}

Answer for VB.NET from Purple Ant:

For Each objectItem as ObjectType in objectTypeList
    'Do some stuff '
Next
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7  
Since it's strongly typed, you could also use: foreach(var item in itemlist). –  Steven Sudit Apr 21 '10 at 18:05
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With any generic implementation of IEnumerable the best way is:

//C#
foreach( var item in listVariable) {
    //do stuff
}

There is an important exception however. IEnumerable involves an overhead of Current() and MoveNext() that is what the foreach loop is actually compiled into.

When you have a simple array of structs:

//C#
int[] valueTypeArray;
for(int i=0; i < valueTypeArray.Length; ++i) {
     int item = valueTypeArray[i];
     //do stuff
}

Is quicker.


Update

Following a discussion with @Steven Sudit (see comments) I think my original advice may be out of date or mistaken, so I ran some tests:

// create a list to test with
var theList = Enumerable.Range(0, 100000000).ToList();

// time foreach
var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
foreach (var item in theList)
{
    int inLoop = item;
}
Console.WriteLine("list  foreach: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());

sw.Reset();
sw.Start();

// time for
int cnt = theList.Count;
for (int i = 0; i < cnt; i++)
{
    int inLoop = theList[i];
}
Console.WriteLine("list  for    : " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());

// now run the same tests, but with an array
var theArray = theList.ToArray();

sw.Reset();
sw.Start();

foreach (var item in theArray)
{
    int inLoop = item;
}
Console.WriteLine("array foreach: " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());

sw.Reset();
sw.Start();

// time for
cnt = theArray.Length;
for (int i = 0; i < cnt; i++)
{
    int inLoop = theArray[i];
}
Console.WriteLine("array for    : " + sw.Elapsed.ToString());

Console.ReadKey();

So, I ran this in release with all optimisations:

list  foreach: 00:00:00.5137506
list  for    : 00:00:00.2417709
array foreach: 00:00:00.1085653
array for    : 00:00:00.0954890

And then debug without optimisations:

list  foreach: 00:00:01.1289015
list  for    : 00:00:00.9945345
array foreach: 00:00:00.6405422
array for    : 00:00:00.4913245

So it appears fairly consistent, for is quicker than foreach and arrays are quicker than generic lists.

However, this is across 100,000,000 iterations and the difference is about .4 of a second between the fastest and slowest methods. Unless you're doing massive performance critical loops it just isn't worth worrying about.

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The question was about List<T>, not arrays. Regardless, I don't believe that foreach on an native array actually uses IEnumerable, at least not in optimized code, so there's no real speed-up to be had. In fact, my test shows foreach taking only three quarters the time of for. –  Steven Sudit Apr 21 '10 at 18:04
    
@Steven Sudit - foreach loops actually suffer versus for loops once compiler optimisation has been applied. However I did some digging around - in the case of an array foreach is optimised to exactly the same IL as a for. For a List<T> the compiler can't use this optimisation and the resulting IL is slightly slower. Looks like we're both wrong (._. ) –  Keith Apr 22 '10 at 8:20
    
I wasn't just speaking from theory. I wrote a short test and ran it. If you'd like, I would be glad to dig it up and post it so that you can see how it works for you. –  Steven Sudit Apr 23 '10 at 13:37
    
@Steven Sudit - yeah, me too. I've updated the answer with the results. –  Keith Apr 23 '10 at 14:37
    
Let me thank you for putting in the hard work, but I should mention that my tests had one key difference: I made sure the loops passed each element to an external method. Without this, the compiler is likely to optimize away the assignment entirely. I don't know if this accounts for the tiny speed boost, but it easily could. –  Steven Sudit Apr 26 '10 at 7:51
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For VB.NET:

For Each tmpObject as ObjectType in ObjectTypeList
    'Do some stuff '
Next

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C#

myList<string>().ForEach(
    delegate(string name)
    {
        Console.WriteLine(name);
    });

Anonymous delegates are not currently implemented in VB.Net, but both C# and VB.Net should be able to do lambdas:

C#

myList<string>().ForEach(name => Console.WriteLine(name));

VB.Net

myList(Of String)().ForEach(Function(name) Console.WriteLine(name))

As Grauenwolf pointed out the above VB won't compile since the lambda doesn't return a value. A normal ForEach loop as others have suggested is probably the easiest for now, but as usual it takes a block of code to do what C# can do in one line.


Here's a trite example of why this might be useful: this gives you the ability to pass in the loop logic from another scope than where the IEnumerable exists, so you don't even have to expose it if you don't want to.

Say you have a list of relative url paths that you want to make absolute:

public IEnumerable<String> Paths(Func<String> formatter) {
    List<String> paths = new List<String>()
    {
        "/about", "/contact", "/services"
    };

    return paths.ForEach(formatter);
}

So then you could call the function this way:

var hostname = "myhost.com";
var formatter = f => String.Format("http://{0}{1}", hostname, f);
IEnumerable<String> absolutePaths = Paths(formatter);

Giving you "http://myhost.com/about", "http://myhost.com/contact" etc. Obviously there are better ways to accomplish this in this specfic example, I'm just trying to demonstrate the basic principle.

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Your VB code won't work. VB only supports anonymous functions in this version, you have to wait until VB10 to have anonymous subroutines. –  Jonathan Allen Sep 9 '08 at 8:21
    
You are correct, I didn't test it before posting. No wonder documentation for lambda expressions in VB are so scarce; they aren't nearly as useful. –  Adam Lassek Sep 18 '08 at 19:15
    
Obvious question: Why bother with callbacks when you can just do a foreach? –  Steven Sudit Apr 21 '10 at 18:06
    
You're assuming that the IEnumerable and delegate are from the same scope, but despite my simple example they don't have to be. Being able to pass a closure into a function from another scope can be a very powerful design pattern. –  Adam Lassek Apr 21 '10 at 18:18
    
Maybe an example might help. And please start your posts to me with "@Steve" so that I get notified. –  Steven Sudit Apr 21 '10 at 18:51
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Without knowing the internal implementation of a list, I think generally the best way to iterate over it would be a foreach loop. Because foreach uses an IEnumerator to walk over the list, it's up to the list itself to determine how to move from object to object.

If the internal implementation was, say, a linked list, then a simple for loop would be quite a bit slower than a foreach.

Does that make sense?

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Yes, because a linked list would need to search linearly for each new item, whereas an iterator over it would just take one pass. –  Steven Sudit Apr 21 '10 at 18:13
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It depends on your application:

  • for loop, if efficiency is a priority
  • foreach loop or ForEach method, whichever communicates your intent more clearly
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Why would foreach be slower? –  Steven Sudit Apr 21 '10 at 18:13
    
foreach translates into GetEnumerator(), MoveNext() and Current() calls which is obviously slower than incrementing a indexer and selecting from an array. We're talking nanoseconds though and is usually not of any concerns. –  Pauli Østerø Dec 11 '10 at 4:13
    
"for (index = objectListType.Count - 1; count >= 0; --count) { /* ... */ }" is the best way in my opinion, for one reason. It allows you to remove items while iterating. And if you decide to remove an item from objectListType "objectListType.RemoveAt(index)" while looping, you won't get any strangeness or Modification-While-Enumeration exceptions. It's nice that it is performant. –  TamusJRoyce Oct 27 '11 at 19:15
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I may be missing something, but iterating through a generic list should be fairly simple if you use my examples below. The List<> class implements the IList and IEnumerable interfaces so that you can easily iterate through them basically any way you want.

The most efficient way would be to use a for loop:

for(int i = 0; i < genericList.Count; ++i) 
{
     // Loop body
}

You may also choose to use a foreach loop:

foreach(<insertTypeHere> o in genericList)
{
    // Loop body
}
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No need to <insertTypeHere>. The compiler with do it for you with var. –  Steven Sudit Apr 21 '10 at 18:14
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